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LoneWulf [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

Thanks for the tip, fren. It's surprisingly hard to take good photos of the moon. I've tried using my tripod, but it isn't steady enough. Just pushing the button to take the photo causes enough motion to blur the photo. Not to mention, it's hard to frame the moon using a tripod, as you don't realize how fast it's moving. By the time you're set up, the moon has already moved out of the position you wanted it in.

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harkk 1 point ago +1 / -0

I haven't used a tripod that much but go to a camera shop and see what they suggest. There are bulbs you can get that will push the button for you. I know you can use a very short delay between clicking and the actual shot, but that won't work with something that's moving. Clicking slowly while concentrating on not moving the camera helps.

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LoneWulf [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

Yeah, I've thought the same thing about using a bulb. It's probably the only way you could get the shot. Not sure, though, whether one can be used with the camera I have.

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harkk 1 point ago +1 / -0

I had a Powershot years ago and I don't know either. Camera shop should know.

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LoneWulf [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

I had one of the older Powershots, too. Was the first camera I got after film cameras went out of vogue. It was a small, but good camera that was excellent for taking on trips, as it took up very little space, yet still took really nice photos. It eventually died, so that's what prompted me to get my current camera.

Ironically, the reason I bought this camera was because I had the opportunity to take a behind-the-scenes tour of the Smithsonian. I wanted a good camera to take photos, knowing I'd never get to do this again. Naturally, COVID-19 hit right before I was to go, so I never got there. It seems unlikely that I'll have a second chance at it, either. Sigh.