9
IvanMectin 9 points ago +9 / -0

That's an article from 2013, FYI ... how come it's just being posted here now?

The article says the referenced report would be published in a few weeks; did it get published? Suppressed?

1
IvanMectin 1 point ago +1 / -0

I have a 'random thought' about 'contaminants'. Not arguing with your last point, just a thought. There's a requirement, in vaccines as well as in just about all medical practices, for 'purity'. This 'purity' is expressed in various ways, but 'parts per million' is one that comes to mind (it's not '100% purity' - some contamination is expected and allowed). So the 'raw ingredients' of the vax have to meet these criteria, and if they don't, the batch is typically destroyed. Now, I don't know what these exact criteria are, but let's just say - 'x' parts per million. If you test the product, and find contaminants that don't exceed 'x', you are good to go.

So as alarming as it may sound that some 'tester' somewhere finds 'something' in the vaccine, maybe they are just finding those small amounts that are allowed and expected? And as scary as it may look/sound to find some 'weird stuff' in a vaccine, if it's ultra small, maybe it's just not relevant (not big enough to matter). It's kinda like when they test food samples. There's all manner of nasty stuff in our food, but our bodies are well-equipped to deal with this and 100% purity is not even close to being required. Reminds me of the saying about sausages ... you may be better served not knowing exactly how the sausage is made ...

6
IvanMectin 6 points ago +6 / -0

I followed this aspect of the story early on because I'm an engineer and enjoy looking into logistics like transport and delivery. For what its worth, there are two factors that tell me there is nothing sinister in the 'temperature' angle.

  1. The initial requirements were for extremely cold 'long term' storage. They knew that even local pharmacies didn't have the means to keep it that cold. So it's kept very cold when manufactured, and when delivered, but once received it can be stored at a more normal refrigeration temperature as long as it is used within 'x' days. I forget the numbers, but something like 15 days.

  2. The initial requirement for extremely cold storage was due to many unknowns. They didn't KNOW how cold it needed to be kept (or for how long) because they hadn't had it long enough to do actual long-term tests on stability. So they erred on the side of caution and required very low temp storage. As time passed, they relaxed the temp requirements based on experience.

I'm not sticking up for the vax as such, I just think this one is not a valid issue.

1
IvanMectin 1 point ago +2 / -1

Before the vax came out, the claim was that every death, however unlikely, was being attributed to Covid by the MSM to spread fear about the vax. Now, after the vax, the claim is that every death, however unlikely, is being attributed to the vax by patriots to spread fear about the vax. In both cases, it makes it that much harder to find the truth. Trump would never encourage an activity that would kill off his supporters.

0
IvanMectin 0 points ago +1 / -1

plenty of Ibuprofin

What are you suggesting as 'plenty'? My g/f had surgery recently and was prescribed 'strong' ibuprofen for pain. She ended up back in the hospital with internal bleeding caused by the ibuprofen, so I'd advise caution with ibuprofen. Also goes to show even simple meds, when taken at the wrong dose, can be problematic.

And why ibuprofen specifically, rather than aspirin?

1
IvanMectin 1 point ago +2 / -1

As soon as vaccine was added to the blood, it started losing its right red color indicating it was losing its ability to hold oxygen.

I bought a pulse oximeter recently as I'd read that blood oxygen levels are a great measure of your overall health. I'm double vaxxed (Pfizer) since April and haven't noticed any drop in my oxygen levels, which are around 96-97% consistently.

I had a 'bad day' right after dose 2, which tells me I didn't get saline.

I'm much more interested in the blood clots. Not sure how to watch out for those, other than by falling over!

1
IvanMectin 1 point ago +2 / -1

How would you personally characterize the 'heart issues' - which ones specifically do you think could be vax-related?

I like your point that 'horrible shit happens to people all the time ...'. Just last year, before the vax, we all accused the DS of blaming every death, however unlikely/unrelated, on covid. Now we are doing something similar, we are blaming every death, however unlikely/unrelated, on the vax!

But the 'heart issues' - I see some potential correlation there.

1
IvanMectin 1 point ago +2 / -1

Did you mean to say, "I have already LOST one family member ..." (word missing)? What exactly did they die of, if you don't mind me asking?

0
IvanMectin 0 points ago +1 / -1

Truth Social COULD BE Facebook-Amazon... etc. But it could also be MySpace, Yahoo, AOL, etc. This is a very difficult market to succeed in. I just read recently how ATT are selling their stake in Warner Media for 43 BILLION. Read also about Qibi - failed after 6 months, and led by some industry experts.

Not saying it WON'T succeed, but it faces a huge amount of obstacles. Anyone wanting to risk money, have at it - just don't spend money you can't afford to lose.

2
IvanMectin 2 points ago +3 / -1

You only take a loss when you SELL. No sell, no loss

Absolutely true, but ... the money is SPENT when you buy, and once bought, the money is tied up until you sell.

0
IvanMectin 0 points ago +1 / -1

I did great back in the day buying and selling certain stocks that just seemed naturally volatile - up $10 today, down $10 tomorrow, backup $15 the next day ... etc. I just kept putting in buy orders, and then, sell orders, every few days. But - I once got caught holding the bag on a high-tech stock that died (dropped to zero), and I probably gave back all my gains from the preceding 6 months! In the meantime, stocks like Costco and Oracle have given me returns in the region of 1,600% and 900% (since 2000).

1
IvanMectin 1 point ago +2 / -1

Just curious - if you have internet access and can post this message, what's stopping you from buying shares online? I can access my Fidelity account from anywhere.

2
IvanMectin 2 points ago +3 / -1

You keep it for as long as you want. It's yours, held on your behalf by Fidelity (in this example). It's value will change every day and you can follow it as closely as you want. Buying one or two shares is a good way to 'force' (encourage) you to follow the market. There are no tax consequences until you sell, at which point, only the profit element is taxable, and that tax can be either short term (treated as income) or long term (treated more favorably) depending on how long you hold it. Just be aware any stock can drop to nothing and there's no insurance to back it up. Edit To Add - there CAN be minor tax consequences if the stock issues dividends, but if you only buy one share then this is not likely to be an issue. Plus, I doubt this would be a dividend-issuing stock.

0
IvanMectin 0 points ago +1 / -1

The wording doesn't sound to me like a simple split; splits are of virtually no monetary value, other than it allows some people who couldn't afford even 1 share to buy one. This sounds like an award of some sort. But it's all speculative based on future results.

0
IvanMectin 0 points ago +1 / -1

Are you being sarcastic? DWAC is a shell at the moment, with no real tangible product. The stock is just about the only tangible manifestation, and that's all speculation. It did drop today, FWIW.

1
IvanMectin 1 point ago +2 / -1

I thought the 'fake insurrection' was all Antifa / etc?

3
IvanMectin 3 points ago +4 / -1

I agree with you. Some people are using their own personal experience as 'proof' of one thing or another. My g/f and I eat pretty much the same food but I'm as skinny as a rake, and she puts on weight. I'm 'regular', she's constipated. She has high blood pressure and low cholesterol, I have low blood pressure and high cholesterol (we've been together for almost 30 years so this is not a casual observation). By all accounts, I have a very high metabolism, she doesn't.

The only way you can really make sense of this stuff is when you study a large sample of people. Also, you may feel great until ... you don't. I know people who have died of heart-attacks and cancer after what they considered a healthy existence. When you study people who are reaching 90, 100 years old with few medical problems, then you can start drawing conclusions.

0
IvanMectin 0 points ago +1 / -1

I would agree with you. At the very minimum, high fiber helps avoid constipation. Some people are lucky in that they don't get constipation without fiber, but fiber is really helpful to most.

1
IvanMectin 1 point ago +2 / -1

Almost NONE of those fruits and vegetables are the way they were 100,000 years ago.

Isn't that a statement you could equally apply to virtually all meat products we eat today? I just ate a bison burger so this is on my mind at the moment!

You have to seek out sources to get meat that isn't terribly 'modified' (pork has been 'refined' in recent times to make it more 'lean', as an obvious example). But even the less 'refined' meats of today are still nothing like they were hundreds, let alone hundreds of thousands, of years ago.

0
IvanMectin 0 points ago +1 / -1

It is antisocial to be sick in public with a communicable disease, and it's an example of 'personal responsibility' to stay home under these circumstances. Most people do have friends who will shop for them, or these days you have "instacart" and other similar services. And if you are totally alone, then fine - go shopping, but if you suddenly start coughing, try to get outside and/or away from others, since you are spreading germs.

Forget about "Covid" and the big debate about how it spreads; coughs, colds, and flu are all communicable and it's common decency to stay out of public spaces when you are contagious.

I don't think I'm 'better' than this person; I don't see them as 'beneath' me; I'm expecting them to take the same responsibility I would take myself.

1
IvanMectin 1 point ago +2 / -1

around 85% of the people are what I guess you could call "pro vaccine." Also ranging from "orange man super bad," to "I don't like him he's a dickhead" as far as PDJT is concerned.

Are you in an unusually lib neighborhood? Many folks here seem to disbelieve that the vax is popular, and that DJT is unpopular, and yet this seems to suggest that.

0
IvanMectin 0 points ago +1 / -1

Totally ignoring the Coof, and the events of the past few years, isn't it anti-social, and irresponsible behavior to be coughing like that in public? If I started coughing uncontrollably in a crowded space, 5 years or 10 years ago, I would head out of the place so as not to affect those around me. Coof has certainly made people more aware of this concept, but common courtesy has been around a long time.

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