255
posted ago by SkiSkiUSMC ago by SkiSkiUSMC +255 / -0

Alright, so, first up, this is just a small list of items that I personally have in my set up. This is aside from my armor and load out. This is what is in my pack at all times, ready to roll in the event shtf. It’s a daypack/assaultpack whatever you called it in your branch, that same shit, packed with the basic essentials. Everyone has their own load out of their erhm…”fishing tackle” so go with what works for you. This will be the stuff you carry on your back. Don’t forget to include an IFAK in your fishing tackle that is separate from the medical in your daypack. Don’t mix those two up.

Medical:

Quick clot (You can use the gauze or the powder here, it doesn’t matter. Learn how to use it and keep it handy. It could save your life or your battle buddy’s one day.)

Tourniquet (Nuff said.)

Nasal tube (Vital for blocked airway passages after trauma to the neck, throat, nose etc. this same tube will also double for opening up the trachea if need be.)

Sucking chest wound kit (You can either make your own by using some plastic and tape, tape three sides down and leave one side open for draining, or you can buy the pre-made kits. I’d recommend them but also know how to make your own.)

Pneumothorax kit (Don’t be cheap, just buy a sterile prepackaged kit with this. It’ll save yours or your battle buddy’s life.)

Sterilized blade (Nuff said.)

Curved needle and thread (Stitches.)

Butterfly bandage (Don’t waste your needle and thread if you don’t have to.)

Tri bandage (Multiple uses, sling for broken/sprained arm, protection from the sun etc.)

Glycerin (Skin treatment, laxative.)

Scissors (Nuff said.)

Iodine wipes (Sterilize.)

Alcohol wipes (Sterilize.)

Liquid bandage (Easy for small cuts, also acts caustic and stops bleeding.)

Super glue (Slightly bigger cuts that don’t require stitches but need to be closed in a hurry.)

Elastic bandage (Wrap wounds.)

Non stick gauze (Nuff said.)

Moleskin (You’re gonna get blisters on the move. Take care of your feet, without them, you’re dead.)

Tweezers (Nuff said.)

Potassium permanganate (Water treatment and also doubles as a fire starter. Mix it with the glycerin above and a chemical reaction occurs that creates an very hot fire, very fast.)

So that pretty much sums it up for a basic medical list of supplies you’ll need for anything traumatic to stay in the battle. You can throw in some other shit like Motrin, aspirin etc. but I’d rather suck it the fuck up. Next up will be a basic gear list to get you buy easily the first week rationing out food bars then after that you’ll have to rely heavily on your survival skills when the food bars run out.

Daypack:

Survival bars x 3 (Pretty cheap and reliable food bars can be found at Walmart that have a shelf life of 5 years. Plenty of calories to ration out for a week worth of go juice. Yes they taste like shit.)

Poncho liner (Gotta have your woobie to stay warm.)

Water filtration tube (Sawyer makes a great mini that doesn’t take up a lot of room in the bag and is good for thousands of gallons. This will save you on the move but you should rely on boiling.)

Binos (Nuff said.)

First aid (Fit your medical pack in here.)

Camel back bladder (Fill up when you can. The more mobile you are the better your chances of survival. If you have to keep stopping for water then you’re a bigger target in the open.)

Fire starting (Magnesium stick/flint stick whatever you want. Something reliable that will be your primary form. The stuff in your med kit is a last resort.)

Camping Knife (Any survival knife will do here. Good quality steel, holds a decent edge. This won’t be for fighting, it will be for skinning, breaking wood, cutting ropes etc.)

Signal mirror (Your choice on this. It can save your life but it is also a giveaway of your position.)

Leatherman (Nuff said.)

Pens, pencils, waterproof paper rite in the rain (Should always keep this handy. Draw terrain out, make notes, track your distance, recon, etc.)

Lensatic compass (Learn how to use one of these. This will be how you travel when electronic go down.)

Waterproof map (Get one of your area and learn how to read it. Learn the difference between true north and magnetic north. Learn how to transfer between your compass and the grid.)

Survival books (Foraging, snares, traps, what to eat, what to avoid, plants, wildlife etc.)

550 cord (Nuff said.)

Survival 22lr (STRICTLY for small game only. Rabbits, squirrels, birds etc. do not waste this ammo for any other purpose. This entire rifle stows away compacted in the bag and even floats. This should also be as a last resort. First priority should be traps, snares etc.)

Pocket saw (Don’t buy a cheap one. They will break, piss you off and kill morale in a survival scenario. Spend the $50 and get a hood one.)

Canteen cup combo (Gotta boil water in something. Can cook in it as well.)

Altoid tin with cloth (Easy charcloth setup. Learn how to make it, do it and store it in here. Very good tinder when needed however you should use this last and search for fresh tinder before all else. Save your supplies and don’t be lazy.)

Emergency radio (You can get a solar powered one for $20 now. It is worth it.)

Space blanket (One time use but it takes barely any weight/space so why not.)

Baby wipes (Wipe your ass, clean your body, unscented only. Fight the swamp ass, stop the jock itch, stay in the fight.)

Tarp (Shelter, rain protection, mud/dirt protection. Get one, camo, no stupid bright colors that make you stand out.)

That’s all I got to share for now frens. If anyone else wants to add to this, please make a comment like this

Medical or Daypack Item here Reasoning here

This will help us all share the knowledge we have. This is my first truly high effort post and I hope you all enjoy and engage so we can all stay frosty together. WWG1WGA

Comments (132)
sorted by:
27
ARandomOgre 27 points ago +28 / -1

Everyone is embarrassed to say it, but tampons are an excellent addition to a survival kit. I have a whole box in mine. Not just for women who might need them, but they're understandably excellent at plugging puncture wounds.

For fire-starters, I have cotton balls soaked in vaseline I keep in a little baggie. They haven't gone dry in years. Throw a couple in your fire pit and light them up.

If you get MREs, the penne pasta and vegetable manicotti ones are good. Avoid anything with whatever they pretend is cheese. Peanut butter also carries an enormous number of calories in a pretty compact package.

Also, no paracord in your list? I have literally traded lengths of paracord for a knife before. That stuff is fucking gold. :)

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SkiSkiUSMC [S] 9 points ago +9 / -0

Gotta love that mythical chocolate peanut butter in the MRE’s!

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Mount_10_ear 4 points ago +4 / -0

I like em and the crackers

4
ARandomOgre 4 points ago +5 / -1

I am blanking on remembering if it was called a ranger cracker or ranger bread, but whatever dry flavorless wafer thing was usually the best part.

Especially since those were the ones that came with jelly packets, and you can usually trade those. People love sugar.

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Mount_10_ear 5 points ago +5 / -0

Ranger bread lol I have some at home

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Gammmadorf 1 point ago +1 / -0

Is that like those really thin "pilot bread" cracker like deals?

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Mount_10_ear 1 point ago +1 / -0

Lol yes.

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Dee68 8 points ago +8 / -0

Ok. Since you went there, have your woman switch to a menstrual cup. This is reusable. Just wash it. She will be able to use it month after month (and it's better for the environment 😜).

Save the tampons for the puncture wounds. Great call on these BTW.

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UnbreakablePatriot 7 points ago +7 / -0

Well said. Menstrual cups are so much cleaner anyway and you don't have to change it as often as a tampon. Nor does it cause toxic shock. I kicked the tampons years ago. Saves a ton of money and space.

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DogeToTheMoon 6 points ago +6 / -0

550 cord (Nuff said.)

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deleted 1 point ago +1 / -0
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Galvatron27 5 points ago +5 / -0

Dangit...I was just going to tell him thank you for using the term 550 Cord and not "paracord." No one in the military says "paracord" I'm not sure where that name came from but 550 cord is named because that's it's tensile strength and is used to attach the parachute canopy to the risers.

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deleted 1 point ago +1 / -0
5
Mount_10_ear 5 points ago +5 / -0

Some old fashioned white birch bark is amazing. You can put it in water and hit it with a flame and it will burn due to the oils in it. Also pine pitch. It's Amazing burns like model glue ( old world model glue ) when you see a pine with a natural break or old cut and it's thick and white. Use a blade scrape it onto a piece of birch bark. Shits amazing Nature provides so much for us

1
Petlore 1 point ago +1 / -0

How long will it burn for

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Mount_10_ear 1 point ago +1 / -0

Enough to start wet wood. Depends how much you use. The bark you can scrape and make like a dust to hit with a flint rod Pitch needs a flame to start .. search bushcraft " fatwood "

Lighter and matches should be in a kit ( just remembered that )

19
SnoopDOGEDOGE 19 points ago +19 / -0

Thermal Reflective Tarp is an absolute must have. You cannot camouflage your body temp without one.

12
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 12 points ago +12 / -0

Excellent choice! I forgot to mention that. That’s our biggest weakness is thermal from above.

6
Mount_10_ear 6 points ago +6 / -0

This !!!

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BQnita 16 points ago +16 / -0

Well done patriot! Nicely put together and very thought out. I'm pretty sure you covered all the bases. 😉🇺🇸 High Effort indeed !

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SkiSkiUSMC [S] 10 points ago +10 / -0

I wish I could’ve organized it better so it’s not so hard on the eyes but i did it all on my phone ☹️

2
ARandomOgre 2 points ago +3 / -1

Is there a way to add bullets on here? I’m sure there’s probably a clever way to do it via directly writing the code.

Or just use asterisks.

3
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 3 points ago +3 / -0

Honestly, im still learning how this stuff works. I’d like to have this cleaned up and looking pretty so it’s easier on the eyes and separated better but I did it all on my phone and I don’t have a damn clue how to change it up.

3
Recyclops 3 points ago +3 / -0
  • Using a - followed by a space, then whatever text, makes a bullet point.
2
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 2 points ago +2 / -0
  • like this?

Woot woot!!!! Learned something new!

3
ILearnedToCode 3 points ago +3 / -0

Theres all sorts of formatting

Techniques that you

  • can use

  • headers are made with a '# <text>'

  • code formatting is done with back ticks

  • three backticks makes a code block

function life() {
    var life = 42;
    return life;
}
1
ARandomOgre 1 point ago +2 / -1
  • test

Hey, that's swell. Thank you.

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deleted 10 points ago +10 / -0
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SkiSkiUSMC [S] 5 points ago +5 / -0

Exactly what I did. Also wear a knife around my neck with more 550 as the necklace and grip.

1
Can-Maga 1 point ago +1 / -0

You're not worried about it getting caught on something?

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Sadness 8 points ago +8 / -0

Add tea-tree oil, clove oil and lavender oil. Also pack a decent jar of coconut oil, to dilute the essentials. It is better not to use straight essential oil. Lavender is safe for your liver if taken internally (even for small children) if you have a tooth-ache, or as an emergency tooth cleaner (a few drops on toothbrush.). I have cured kidney infections with lavender oil before, by swallowing some and rubbing it on the outside. Clove oil kills pain, but it will also kill nerve-endings in the long run. A sort of do-it-yourself root-canal, in emergencies. Don't put clove-oil on open wounds, it burns. Rather use lavender. Tea-tree is excellent for bites, warts, small cuts etc. Coconut oil is very soothing for sun-burn, cleaning dirty scalp, face treatment, and toothbrushing etc. Trust me, when you are living rough, it is a true blessing. Some people like cooking with it, but I detest the flavour.

3
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 3 points ago +3 / -0

Do you have any other recommendations to substitute lavender? Sadly, I’m allergic.

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Sadness 5 points ago +5 / -0

rosemary or chamomile, but they are much more expensive. Both of those are safe to use on infants (diluted of course).

2
anonforeverandever 2 points ago +2 / -0

not sure what sadness was suggesting lavender is best for, but in terms of survivalism, i'd make sure to always have oil of oregano (antibiotic), tea tree, clove (kills all mites like scabies, fleas, ticks, and is great for tooth infections as is oil of oregano and myrrh) myrrh, and then i'd take something for mental relaxation (aromatherapy) like peppermint or lavender, to boost the mood. something to note about peppermint is that it's adaptogenic meaning if you need energy, it will give you energy, and if you need calmness, it will calm you down.

7
Imin-theinternet 7 points ago +7 / -0

All i am missing is 22lr and a safety mirror. Yay im prepped almost.

2
CarrieDodson17 2 points ago +2 / -0

I have nearly none of this and I love the list so thank you very much for sharing. I am just wondering....where is everyone planning to go (and is wandering through the wildness really safer than just fortifying your home)???? Maybe I'm just a big homebody but if shtf I was planning to just hunker in with my nuts and seeds and almond butter and compost pile and candles and books. Meditate more. Fast more. Consume less. I have some concerns about long term water (I have short term supplies stocked) but otherwise why not just stay home or group together with friends or families in a home/safe place situation instead of wandering in the wilderness? I am probably very naive so not trying to criticize anyone for these great suggestions, just maybe having trouble imagining a world where we are all sneaking around and hiding from each other.

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Imin-theinternet 3 points ago +3 / -0

So a bug out bag is kind of a double edge sword. It is generally safer to stay put at home. If you think about it, what are the chances something happens in your neighborhood? Most likely slim to none. The bag is more of a oh shit, we have to retreat last ditch effort. Lets be real, you are not running at the first sign of trouble. Or even the fourth sign. You are going at the point you know you have to go. Like the wild fires are a block away type thing.

No one smart will tell you where they are going. That is their family secret. In regards ro wandering the forest, no it is more dangerous in the forest then your home.

Fortifying your home and getting family friends, and neighbors to form a small group is ideal. Each one looks after the other. Your home is ideal because it has all your stuff in it.

I generally say the stuff in your bug out bag should be in your home in a bag. That way you know where it is, its all in one place, and if you need to run, you grab the bag and run. No looking for shit, no checklists, no nothing. I have a bag. But my bag has 10% of the stuff. The rest is in a bin in my house. I use my bag daily so i dont need to carry fire starting or compass or a rifle in it.

If you start collecting the stuff on this list, it is more important to be able to use it then to actually have it if that makes any sense. If you are not trained in trauma, get trained. If you cant shoot for shit learn. If you think looking at a compass is all you need to tell where north is, you are wrong.

2
CarrieDodson17 2 points ago +2 / -0

Thanks for taking time to address this question and for the great ideas about the bin and the bag and becoming more skilled. I appreciate it.

3
Imin-theinternet 3 points ago +3 / -0

No problem. My pleasure

3
Dee68 3 points ago +3 / -0

I am planning on staying put. I will not be putting my self or my son on the road trying to find shelter. I plan to make my stand here.

We live on a culdesac next to a wooded wetland. So plenty of fire wood.

Water. Filtration needs to be solved. Dragging my feet on this.

Bathroom. Have thought about it. Installed a bidet last year to remove dependence on toilet paper. If we need an outhouse, I'm thinking of a place in the yard away from the water. Other than the bidet, no action here.

Medical backpack. We have first aid kits. Need to create a medical back pack with some of the things listed in this thread. The pack is more for simplicity than travel. I could just as easily use a bin, but if I need to evac, think fire, tornado, etc, it's easier to grab and go.

Have worked to remove all dependence on prescription meds.

Need to remove dependency on coffee.

Staying put shopping list: coffee, sugar, alcohol (fifths or divided into jars), honey - these become new currency, money will be worthless.

I do not have a bug out bag.

A number of years ago, we were blessed by having a large fire about to consume where we lived. Woke up to a neighborhood filled with smoke. We were leaving for a family event for the weekend. Had to quickly determine what goes with us and what gets left behind. We took the cats, photos, a quilt my MIL made as a wedding present, jewelry my husband gave me - sentimental vs valuable. That's it. It clarified very quickly what was important. A bug out bag is like that, only it's just survival.

Y2K was a great trial run. What were some of the prepper things you saw or did? That was when I started reading some books by Cody lundin. Have always been fascinated by post apocalyptic TEOTWAWKI type literature. Anything plague or EMP related (movies, books, disaster prep) will cause your mind to run down these what if paths. Great thought exercise if nothing else.

I do not have any special insight into what will happen. My gut tells me it will get very dark.

People are dangerously delusional - Covid fears rule them. The president pats himself on the back for the disaster that is Afghanistan. Menticide.

The realization that we have large swaths of the population being this unhinged also means that they can easily be controlled. Stay safe.

3
NeverStopBelieving 3 points ago +3 / -0

I’m in San Diego , was thinking the same thing! Wish I was living in Tenn or somewhere safer , but where to go? If I am in the woods hope I run into one of these guys lol

2
CarrieDodson17 2 points ago +2 / -0

I am thinking just the opposite that I hope I don't run into anyone like this! From a preparedness and skills standpoint it is awesome to have someone like this on your team if you plan for that in advance and they know and trust you but in shtf situation I imagine people's mindset defaults to suspicion and fear and mistrust so I would rather not encounter anyone who is likely to quickly form a judgment that I am a potential threat to them or a liability....I can think of worse things than having them view me as a threat or liability too but I don't want to let myself go there now. I'm still in shock and even denial, I think, at what is unfolding in our beloved country. But that is not an excuse for inaction so I will direct more energy to learning and preparing in some way every day. Thanks again for the list and ideas, original poster.

6
sortofsamuel 6 points ago +6 / -0

Nice list. I would add basic water filter and uv water sterilization pen.

4
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 4 points ago +4 / -0

I do have the water filter in there but I didn’t think of the us water pen. That’s a good idea.

5
sortofsamuel 5 points ago +5 / -0

Ahh... I see you wrote water filtration tube, and I was thinking it was just the tube. What kind do you use? I have a cheap one that I pump straight from the stream.

4
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 4 points ago +4 / -0

I like the sawyer brand personally but there are giant ones out there that make things way easier. I just like this one because of the compact ease of use to keep mobility at max. My “fishing gear” load out is around 55lbs so I always have to remember that along with what I throw on my back.

5
Stephanie1 5 points ago +5 / -0

A womans load out is about 25 pounds if she is to have any energy left to walk. I wont even imagine running.

5
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 5 points ago +5 / -0

Your body and mind are a lot more capable than you think. Slow and steady wins the marathon of survival. There’s no sprint here in these situations. Even if you’re only covering 2 clicks at a time and take a 20 minute break in between, just keep moving with your gear.

3
Stephanie1 3 points ago +3 / -0

Will do.

3
Mount_10_ear 3 points ago +3 / -0

Practice practice practice. Go rucking !!!

3
Stephanie1 3 points ago +3 / -0

Ok.

2
Amos 2 points ago +2 / -0

u/Stephanie1

I practiced for the Appalachian Trail with weight on my back, but on the trail, what did me, and others like me, in, after 7-10 days, was being on uneven terrain after having practiced on flat land. Our knees were done in. For a month I crossed streets and went down stairs like I was a hundred years old. Plenty of energy, though. People who rode bikes, their knees were ok.

2
Mount_10_ear 2 points ago +2 / -0

Yea , decents are rough on the knees .. I haven't hiked the AT. Been on sections of it and the LT... I live on the NH / MA border , mid state. We have lots of small trails. We use for training.. I used to put plate steel in my older pack. Now I keep my tent sleep pad quilt acook kit etc in it even on 2 Mile hikes. It an average of 16-20 lbs depending if I carry water or filter, depending on water sources and availability

6
Dee68 6 points ago +6 / -0

Thanks. Great list.

Cody Lundin books. Read one - I have a feeling that he may get repetitive. I have When All Hell Breaks Loose.

First several chapters are about getting your head straight. Super important. You will want to rush into the list of stuff, but i guarantee the psychological aspects will kill you fast if you do not get this right.

Go for items that are simple to use - i.e. a toggle switch or simple knob vs complex operations. Complex is fine when things are calm, but you will be using this under stress, keep it simple.

Prioritize body heat, then water, then food.

One thing I found interesting was candy, peppermint disks like candy canes. Takes the mental stress edge off.

You're emphasizing bug out. If you are staying put (I will be) basic games - cards, dice, board games. Assumes spouse and kids.

Honey. It's worth its weight in gold.

This was not in Cody's book, but buy an extra inexpensive gun for your neighbor. Think granny. Benefit, the more neighbors armed, the better. Plus, and this is a bit cold hearted, she could be a early warning system for you. She fires, you know trouble is afoot.

6
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 6 points ago +6 / -0

I do like Cody’s work. Even though I dislike hippies haha. He has a ton of great knowledge and wisdom to pass down. I will pass this information on to friend and family that will be staying put. My main goal is to disappear and restart a life in the woods away from everything if need be. Excellent note on the honey. I should’ve known that to as I have a friend who lives in the mountains in NC and harvests honey for survival reasons as well. Calories, antiseptic properties and yeah he makes some booze too haha. Thanks for sharing fren!

5
Mount_10_ear 5 points ago +5 / -0

I know their name is tarnished now. But the oath keepers had a video ..hmmm 5-6 years back. On how to make a drone proof ( invisible to thermal infferd etc ) guillie suit ...made with emergency blankets ?? It's a great idea I'm sure it's still available. And it's simple. 2 layers of emergency blankets ( not the 99c ones get decent ones )and a thin layer of insulation basically reflects all heat back to you on the inside and reflects signatures away from you on the out side while covered in the traditional Guillie suit. Camo up cowboys !!

5
Mount_10_ear 5 points ago +5 / -0

Thank you frens. This talk makes me smile. I friggin love it ..

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deleted 5 points ago +5 / -0
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SkiSkiUSMC [S] 4 points ago +4 / -0

And a 40oz’

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deleted 4 points ago +4 / -0
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keeptherepublic100 5 points ago +5 / -0

Thank you sir. Let's hope we never need it

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Wellthatsinteresting 5 points ago +5 / -0

This should be stickied!!! well done indeed

5
SOTUisFUBAR 5 points ago +5 / -0

Thanks fren, good info!

4
7Nick9 4 points ago +4 / -0

Fantastic post ! Honest Q where are you bugging off to ? Fortified home is ideal also. If everyone heads to the mountains in my geography many will be unwelcome is all I'm saying.. Keeping your list thank you Patriot !

4
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 4 points ago +4 / -0

I am down in south Florida and will be heading Midwest for my end goal. Won’t say exactly where and the route I’ll take to get there but I will definitely be in the woods the entire way and the final destination.

4
Feelsgoodman 4 points ago +4 / -0

I love that in the middle of all this serous shit, you used the term woobie 🐸👌❤

2
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 2 points ago +2 / -0

Gotta have your woobie fren!

4
TrumpsWall 4 points ago +4 / -0

Nice

4
gobby 4 points ago +4 / -0

Great info, thank you. My question is, where is a good place to go if one must bug out?

6
Nomoralcompass89 6 points ago +6 / -0

Somewhere rural and atleast 8 miles away from an interstate. Preferably also atleast 8 miles from a major US route as well.

1
gobby 1 point ago +1 / -0

Interesting take, thank you. I'd love to be a million miles away from those thing, lol.

4
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 4 points ago +4 / -0

That’s on you really but I recommend doing some research in your area and plan out where you’re going to go, both short term and long term. Figure out the path you’re going to take on a map. Make sure you’re aware of all resources on the way; the terrain, animals, lakes, rivers etc. Go where you will be comfortable. Ultimately, the goal is to survive, so take that into consideration. You go somewhere loaded with poison ivy, oak and sumac, without medical attention(which you can’t get when shtf) and your chances of survival just dropped heavily. All stuff to seriously sit down and think about.

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gobby 2 points ago +2 / -0

Hmm. Good points. Thanks.

3
probablyacoincidence 3 points ago +3 / -0

We have the best preppers folks

3
multithreaded 3 points ago +3 / -0

Thanks so much for this. My wife and I have been slowly acquiring over the last 18 months, and this fills in so many holes we overlooked.

1
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

Glad I could help fren.

3
CirclebackGinger 3 points ago +3 / -0

I can’t take credit, but my coworker is a vet and big time camper and he suggested keeping a baggie full of lint from the dryer as a fire starter. I’d never heard of this but he said it’s highly flammable and works great! 🤷🏼‍♀️

2
Dee68 2 points ago +2 / -0

Yes. My MIL put the dryer lint in egg cartons - the cardboard kind. Then she melted down old candles and poured it on top of the lint. When hardened, she cut each one apart and gave these out for Christmas for us to use in our fireplaces as fire starters. Worked great.

A baggie is more in line with camping/back packing/bug out and easier to pack.

Pine cones work well too.

1
CirclebackGinger 1 point ago +1 / -0

I know nothing about starting fires like this or really starting fires at all so I’m curious how the melted wax over the dryer lint was helpful as a fire starter. 🤔 I wish my great grandparents were still living, I know they would have all kinds of useful tips for us.

1
Dee68 1 point ago +1 / -0

☺ The wax will burn. I think that since my MIL was giving these out as Christmas presents, it looked nicer than giving us a bag of her old dryer lint. 😉

I think that this is also a boy scout project as well where you take saw dust instead of lint, put it in an egg carton, do the wax thing. Let it harden and then cut apart. Again, fire starters.

Since lint and saw dust fly around, the wax also helps to keep it in place.

They worked great.

1
CirclebackGinger 1 point ago +1 / -0

Ahhhh, makes sense. Storing these tips away for a rainy day! 😉

1
Dee68 1 point ago +1 / -0

Suggestion. Play around with fire. Can do this safely - fireplace or a fire pit.

Friends or family may have either a fire place or fire pit and allow you to start the fire or at the very least show you how to build a fire. Very useful skill to develop.

Camping is a great place to do this as well. Building a back yard fire pit might be an option. Some parks have fire pits and grills, use the pit to gain experience.

Don't forget the marshmallows!

Good luck. ☺

1
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

That is definitely true. Another thing to thing about is your clothing. If you scrape your clothes with a pocket knife it will lift up some of the fibers and have the same effect. Happy prepping fren!

2
CirclebackGinger 2 points ago +2 / -0

Interesting, I never would have thought of that either. 🤔 Now, if I could just win the lottery, I’d put even the best of preppers to shame. I’d go full on bomb bunker w/ enough room and food and ammo for all my GAW frens. 😜🥰

1
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

Hell yeah pede!

2
PatriotSkorzeny 2 points ago +2 / -0

Book Series: 299 Days.

2
MAGALogic 2 points ago +3 / -1

Magnifying glass and curved plastic bottles are useful to channel solar energy for many uses.

Aluminum foil and wax paper are easy to keep around.

A box of rubber bands as they ae versatile to make sling shots or even to keep things together.

A face mesh to protect your face from bugs.

A wide rimmed hat to protect most of your body if standing in direct sunlight for prolonged periods.

Having a whistle to communicate long distances if separated is a great tool. Bullhorn is even better.

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Mount_10_ear 2 points ago +2 / -0

I'm not a camel pack fan , I have several. I've found 1.5 liter bottles by smart water are awesome. I have 2 that are well over a year old. Easy to fill and a couple Sawyer 1 liter bags.

Also I add headlamps and water purification tablets. Boiling water or snow melt is good. But time consuming and I like a emergency bivy. Little more weight but it has a few more purposes .

I love seeing this shit on here. Sadly we may need it and I pray we don't

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SkiSkiUSMC [S] 2 points ago +2 / -0

Ooo I forgot about the purification tablets. Those basically weigh nothing and are a big help.

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Mount_10_ear 3 points ago +3 / -0

I live in the north east. And filters freeze so they work well for winter adventures ...

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SkiSkiUSMC [S] 3 points ago +3 / -0

That’s an excellent point I didn’t think about.

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deleted 2 points ago +2 / -0
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ultra_star 2 points ago +2 / -0

My neighbor cut most of his hand off in a chainsaw accident and his wife poured honey (almost whole jar) on it. Prevented infection and allowed most (about 75%) return of function to hand after surgery. Doctor said it probably saved him from amputation. (note: raw, unfiltered local honey not store brand garbage from south america).

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deleted 2 points ago +2 / -0
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Brickyard 2 points ago +2 / -0

Thank you. I’m adding to what I have now.

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Dee68 2 points ago +2 / -0

Almost forgot. A lot of this assumes SHTF when you are at home. You may not be, you might be at work and need to get home.

Think bus, train, your car out of commission. How far do you have to hoof it? What do you need to get home? What if you cannot get home?

Think nIne eLevEN style attack.

Your bug out bag would need to handle basic needs to get home at a minimum.

When I worked downtown in a major metropolitan area (years ago). I bused in to work. I would plan out routes out of the city if I had to walk. It included where shops were located for ad hoc supplies.

2
g8rb81 2 points ago +2 / -0

Non lubricated condoms.

2
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 2 points ago +2 / -0

Water transport?

5
g8rb81 5 points ago +5 / -0

Lots of stuff. Elastic band, make any container clean and waterproof, protect wounds...

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deleted 2 points ago +2 / -0
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SkiSkiUSMC [S] 2 points ago +2 / -0

Oh shit let’s add it! Lol

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deleted 2 points ago +2 / -0
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SkiSkiUSMC [S] 2 points ago +2 / -0

Although that’s what the sterile blade and nose hose will double for 😜

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deleted 2 points ago +2 / -0
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Cpleb 2 points ago +2 / -0

Thanks

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munlee3 2 points ago +2 / -0

I got my pack ready to go. Lots of good suggestions here. Thank-you. I just got my boots I ordered yesterday. Wearing them now to make sure they get broken in good and got some waterproof wax to take care of them with. Also got some merino socks. The boots were expensive as hell but, they are nice. I went with Kenetrek Mountain Extremes. They have 400 grams of thinsulation and waterproof. I figure if I'm going to be walking I better have some damn good pair of boots to do it in. I haven't figured out what gloves to get yet. Any suggestions?

3
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 3 points ago +3 / -0

I have a list of wearables that I haven’t finished yet. Still taking inventory on it and didn’t want to share until I was finished. I will say though that throughout my entire marine corps career, the only time I’ve ever worn gloves was to change the barrel on a 50cal. I’m a big fan of being able to feel everything I’m touching. If something is ridiculously hot, and you have gloves on (that aren’t rated for extreme heat), by the time you feel the heat, they’re already melted and stuck to your skin.

But, if you’re gonna get gloves, the guys I knew that did use them swore by the oakleys gloves with the hard knuckle plates. They abused the hell out of them but they lasted a long time.

3
munlee3 3 points ago +3 / -0

Thank you for all that. I'll consider what you said. I like a second layer of skin on my hands to protect me. If I'm in cold snowy weather I'll need winter gloves. In fair weather climbing around on rocks I need them to keep me from cuts and may be snake bites. Also, if I'm having to chop, saw or dig to keep me from blisters. I do like the hard knuckle gloves idea.

Note: add a schrade https://www.schrade.com/tools/shovel-saw-combo/1124292.html to the list. A snake, bee and insect bit kit. And if allergic to bees medication.

2
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 2 points ago +2 / -0

Good call on the insect kit. Maybe adding one of those bite pens to the kit would be of use too.

2
LongTimeListener 2 points ago +4 / -2

I love my hook billed machete. Versatile tool in the woods and swamps. Can be used to butcher game, build shelters, firewood, hacking your way through a swamp or through a skull. Id also add a ceramic sharpener.

2
Petlore 2 points ago +2 / -0

'YUNNAN PAIYAO' is a great blood stopper, u can put it on a wound and consume it, if is a Chinese formula, it has been credited to saving many lives. Had a dog bleeding in the nose due to cancer nothing the vet had stopped it, by the 2nd dose it was stopped, and yes it was made for humans.

1
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

This is what contributing something to your frens actually looks like u/aPosteriori

Take notes.

0
Escape2C 0 points ago +1 / -1

Wow, one bug out bag will be huge! Are you carrying that around or spreading it out and hiding the "bags'?

2
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 2 points ago +2 / -0

All packed tight and compact inside a single daypack/assault pack. You’d be surprised how much shit you can fit in one when you have to.

-11
NotaJewMod -11 points ago +1 / -12

All that and you didn't list your pack weight including armor. Sound like a larper considering Potassium permanganate is a controlled chemical

10
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 10 points ago +10 / -0

Can’t let you guys know EVERY little thing 😜 it’s level 3+ steel, 8 mags, 5 primary, 3 secondary full load with bag and gear on not including primary and secondary is 80lbs. Including primary and secondary 92lbs.

Also, I’m no larper, fren. I’m trying to share my information that I learned from the Marine Corps. There’s no reason to get hostile. If you have some knowledge you’d like to share so that we can all learn then please do. If you’re going to come here to talk shit, on handshake status, probably best to move on.

7
Joshheretohelp 7 points ago +7 / -0

lol he called you a larper...ahaha

good list btw dude.... got a few things to add to my kit now. Your med loadout makes me think you went to CLS

edit adding my own personal item for you crazies out there... https://gosun.co/products/sport

4
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 4 points ago +4 / -0

I did go to CLS fren, thanks for noticing brother.

0
NotaJewMod 0 points ago +2 / -2

You don't think a 92lb pack is far too much for a SHTF scenario? I, and only based off the veteran so I'll give you more than I'm sure it's worth when we were in but you don't go 3 miles with a 92lb pack. Most of your shit isn't necessary. Binos? Rifle scope. If you really want to be ready have a bug out place, most land in rural southwest is 10k for 20 acres or more. Get a map and look for roads marked like this - - - - - that means dirt road, and find ways to your place that won't be blocked. Your bug out bag should be 35 or less, you're bugging the fuck out. You'll need to be agile, and I bet lose that armor in the first 10 miles. In a vehicle kit go nuts. But keep that bug out light so you can be light

5
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 5 points ago +6 / -1

No no no you misunderstand fren, my entire load out is 92lbs. Armor, weapons, ammo and pack. You should also stay off of roads. Those are choke points/kill zones that are specifically watched for people taking the easy route.

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NotaJewMod -2 points ago +1 / -3

No I didn't misunderstand, 92lbs is too heavy and i guarantee you'll shed it in the first 10 miles. Yea major roads hence why I pointed out a paper map and dirt roads. What you're just gonna hike over mountains with a 92lb pack? One way or another you'll use roads

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SkiSkiUSMC [S] 5 points ago +5 / -0

You’re still saying it’s a 92lb pack. So yes, you did misunderstand. The pack is nowhere near 92lbs. Let’s break this down Rifle + Pistol + Body armor + Pack

92lbs

I don’t feel like I’m going out on a limb here when I say you’ve never done an actual hump with a full combat load in urban, jungle, mountain or cold weather training because if you did, you’d know 92lbs isn’t shit.

2
tattletalestrangler 2 points ago +2 / -0

Thanks for the info.

So roughly how heavy is the pack? Also, how big is the pack? I assume we're talking about a backpack as that would seem the best way to haul the load over long distances. Seems like it would have to be a pretty large backpack to fit all this stuff.

Also, I don't understand this:

Don’t forget to include an IFAK in your fishing tackle that is separate from the medical in your daypack. Don’t mix those two up.

1
SkiSkiUSMC [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

Hey fren, it’s all about how you pack it that makes everything fit. Look up “marine corps assault pack” and you’ll see the size it’ll be. I wouldn’t recommend that exact model because it’s pretty old school. A lot of the newer styles of assault pack have much better compartmentalization and make packing much easier. Fully packed this thing doesn’t weigh more than 25-30lbs depending on what you choose to carry in it off the list. The fishing tackle is my joke about how you set up your plate carrier. IFAK is an Individual First Aid Kit and is worn on your person at all times. The medical list I provided will be separate from that and be inside your pack at all times. You should have both to be prepared for survival scenarios.

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SkiSkiUSMC [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

Here’s a good example of the newer models.

https://www.acu.com/item/f560875236/#.YS8acOT3a_Y

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SnoopDOGEDOGE 4 points ago +4 / -0

Fuck Roads ...... Train Tracks is the way

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Feelsgoodman 2 points ago +2 / -0

"Where we're going we don't need roads"😎

1
NotaJewMod 1 point ago +1 / -0

Meh I got 4x4, have fun packing it hundreds of miles along the train tracks. Gallon of water is over 8 lbs how long you walking?