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posted ago by nomadic ago by nomadic +299 / -0

I mean the morning of, as it went down -- regardless of what came afterward, or what you think of it now.

What was that morning like, for you?

Comments (172)
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catsfive 73 points ago +74 / -1

I was at my desk on the 12th floor of a building which no longer exists, 1/2 block away from Century 21, a clothing store kind of famous for its discounted designer stuff, the WTC filled my entire window. You couldn't see the top of it, even if you pressed your face to the window. I shared the front half of the floor with myself and another designer. We had struck out on her own and had over a quarter million dollars in contracts to deliver that quarter. Then a fire engine came, then another, then it seemed every single fire engine in the state arrived downstairs. The street was so full of emergency vehicles that there were no taxis, which is extremely unusual.

I stupidly went downstairs to quickly see what the matter was. I figured there was just a fire or something. When I got downstairs it was absolute mayhem, and an NYPD officer pushed me away from the building. My laptop, flip phone, camera, everything was sitting upstairs there at my desk.

I walked down to the Battery and stood there, sort of on the side where the Staten Island Ferry terminal is. I stayed there for maybe an hour when the second plane hit. Then the first Tower fell, covering me and everyone with dust, and I walked home over the Brooklyn Bridge along with everybody else. Some of the looks on people's faces that day I won't ever forget. Zoned out.

No one's cell phones worked (and wouldn't for the next 2 or 3 days) . I couldn't communicate with anyone. I found my best friend waiting exactly where he thought I would go looking for him, where we would always meet for lunch at this Chinese restaurant. I stepped around the plane's landing gear while the police were rapping crime scene tape around it on my way to the buffet.

I remember pausing to get away from the crowd standing up the Brooklyn Battery overhang and grasping singed and burned pieces of legal law books paper fluttering down like snow. The pages just fluttered down for literally the next hour. Then the next tower fell and I walked home and watched the news all day

I saw the E-4B up in the sky, orbiting, watching, before the towers fell

Had to wait TWO weeks to get an NYPD escort and get in and retrieve all my things.

For years I lied to my parents and told them I was nowhere near the tragedy and that I just watched it on TV like the rest of them. I had to wait in line for 3 hours to use email because nothing worked

I lost a friend, a firefighter, that day. I've been to the Firefighter Memorial in Colorado Springs to pencil his name off the granite. They do something like 25 firefighters a year the memorial had enough granite to lose maybe 20 years and in one day it would have gotten filled up and even more. They had to quadruple the size of the memorial just to handle 9/11

It's why I'm here

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Im-Wide-Awake 14 points ago +14 / -0

Beautiful story, thanks for sharing!

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Wendyrogersismyhero 8 points ago +8 / -0

❤️🇺🇸

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Phishhed44 5 points ago +5 / -0

Hey Brother, have you had any health issues from the dust etc?

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yomammasayshi 2 points ago +2 / -0

I was gonna ask the same

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catsfive 1 point ago +2 / -1

hey, bud. Thanks for asking. My memory of that day is a bit foggy. When the first tower fell I was near NYC City Hall Manhattan, so, not too much dust, but, some. Then I walked over the Brooklyn Bridge to the Brooklyn Battery and watched the 2nd tower fall from there

I wish I could remember more. I vaguely remember picking pages of burnt law books fluttering down, then I walked home to Park Place, near the park

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Phishhed44 1 point ago +1 / -0

Well, I'm very glad you survived and are here to lead us in this fight. I know it may sound silly, but for some of us, maybe more than some, this board is a refuge from the insanity that surrounds us all. I'm grateful for those that lead the way. I was a leader in my career, but now in my declining years I'm just grateful we have this place, this group, this community. I'm grateful you survived.

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Misschelle 4 points ago +4 / -0

Wow 🙏🏻❤️

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cherry_lollipop 3 points ago +3 / -0

🙏💚

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Reese27 34 points ago +34 / -0

I was working in New York for a very large American Company on an I.T project. I stayed in the hotel opposite the twin towers. I watched the men cleaning the windows on the tower on the 10th Sept. Way above my head on those crazy outside platforms. We had finished what we setout to do so I asked my boss if I could leave early as it was my sons 2nd Birthday the next day. He was great and told me to get going. I flew out of JFK that evening and arrived in the UK early on the 11th. My son had just gone to bed for his afternoon nap around 2 in the afternoon. I switched on the tv and one of the towers was on fire. I double taked and thought I was watching a movie. Then wham, the second one exploded in front of my eyes. The guy from the news channel in the helicopter who was live on air was saying it wasn't a commercial flight, no windows and no commercial plane markings. Later that day my good friend in NY lost a brother, he was one of the first fire fighters to go in. I watched in horror glued to the tv in shock. Today we are celebrating my sons 22nd birthday but will always remember the people who died that day and subsequently later from air polution poisoning.

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PhDinNY 11 points ago +11 / -0

Your story reminds me of how, when watching the TV coverage of the towers burning, it looked real, but when I was outside actually looking at the towers burning, it looked fake!

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Reese27 1 point ago +1 / -0

It was surreal. You where right there then in the thick of it, wow. It seems crazy its been 20 years.

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PhDinNY 1 point ago +1 / -0

And those 20 years went by in a flash!

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Phishhed44 3 points ago +3 / -0

You dodged a bullet friend...😇

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Reese27 2 points ago +2 / -0

I did, you are spot on and although I have to admit, I stay away from MSM particularly on this day and focus on enjoying my sons birthday but I am always thankful and grateful that I got out of there the day before...

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Phishhed44 1 point ago +1 / -0

God...IS GOOD 💕. Being grateful, and respectful is all He wants.

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Sc0paf 30 points ago +30 / -0

7th grade. In math class. Teacher starts acting weird. Class gets interrupted as she walks out into the hallway to discuss something with a few other teachers.

She walks back in and says something along the lines of "you guys are at an age where we can't pretend you're children so I think it's important that when it comes to something like this we be straight with you and tell you what's going on rather than hide it. There's been an attack on America and we're going to stop class for the day because you deserve to be informed." Obviously I don't remember her exact words but it was something like that. I do remember that she was very rattled and a little panicky but also kinda sad. She then got the TV and set it up at the front of the classroom and turned on the news. I feel like I vaguely remember her leaving the room crying at some point during the program? Not sure tho, might be my imagination filling in the blanks at this point.

Looking back, it was a pretty respectable way to approach the situation.

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lvlf1 16 points ago +16 / -0

I was in high-school and during class change one of my friends was saying a plane flew into the twin towers. She was sorta laughing when she said it (kids can react weird to unknown situations I guess) so at the time I thought what class does she take it sounds awesome. I assumed they were doing a 'war game' simulation where different groups make certain moves and you see what would happen. Looking back now, the fact that that was my first thought proves how much times have changed. I'm sure students never 'war game' as different nations for the fear of offending someone, or a kid getting hauled out for 'violent or inappropriate thoughts.' When I got to the next class the TV was on and I realized it was an actual attack. The weird thing about my experience happening at school is I can't remember a single teacher saying anything to us about itself. We would just switch classes, sit down, and silently stare at the tv... teachers included. We watched the news all day, in every classroom. When I walked through the door when I got home my mom was sitting on the edge of her bed watching TV and crying. My father told me he had ran into the bedroom that morning while my mother was still sleeping screaming "WAKE UP THEYRE ATTACKING US, WERE UNDER ATTACK"

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nomadic [S] 14 points ago +14 / -0

Teacher starts acting weird. Class gets interrupted as she walks out into the hallway to discuss something with a few other teachers.

That moment gives me chills just imagining it.

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SassyLass 1 point ago +1 / -0

I woke my kids up to watch the news (I’m in a time zone 4 hours east). We all hugged and prayed and cried.

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SassyLass 1 point ago +1 / -0

Oops, west ...

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JizmJunky 11 points ago +11 / -0

This is more or less how it happened for me, but in 9th grade. I'm in WA state, so my dad woke me up before my alarm to show me fox news coverage. It was chilling

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DontTreadOnIT 4 points ago +4 / -0

Very similar experience for me.

After another teacher came in and shared the news, my teacher turned on the TV and we saw the tower burning. Moments later the second plane hit.

I remember vividly the look on my teacher's face at that moment. He was normally a lighthearted dude, but his solemn expression as he turned off the TV and sat down in his chair made the class fall silent for probably a minute.

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Sc0paf 3 points ago +3 / -0

That last paragraph.. I bet that moment broke the "adult" illusion we all had as kids for so many kids. You know, adults don't cry and are always strong, teachers aren't normal people they're just teachers. Of course I knew they were people but hopefully you know what I mean. It showed humanity. Normal jovial typically unbiased teachers looking terrified, sad, dejected, etc.

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DontTreadOnIT 1 point ago +1 / -0

That's how it felt for me, and I'm sure many others.

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Checkmate 21 points ago +21 / -0

It was the day my eyes began to open.

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cherry_lollipop 12 points ago +12 / -0

I remember saying to my boyfriend, " Eveything has changed. It will never be the same. WE will never be the same." He had no clue what I was saying or feeling--the dolt...

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NJHolyLand 2 points ago +2 / -0

Did you mean it like how Biden meant it when he wrote the Patriot act in the 90s or like how patriots would mean it?

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cherry_lollipop 1 point ago +1 / -0

I can't really say it was exclusively one or the other. I just felt permanently traumatized, and that the country was traumatized.. I instinctively did not like the Patriot Act bs at all, but did not think of myself as a patriot back then. I just wasn't awake.

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judypatriot 5 points ago +5 / -0

Mine too fren. Crazy, surreal, sad. Then resolve to never be fooled again.

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ythehorses 17 points ago +17 / -0

September 11, 2001. I was getting ready for work that morning in our home near Phoenix, Arizona. I had the TV on, playing the morning news on my favorite show, the Today show. I watched the entire thing unfold live on TV. The confusion of the first plane, when they said it was an "accident", then the 2nd plane hit, and we were told this was a possible terrorist attack. I remember crying like never before. It was overwhelming. And I believed everything they said.

When I went into work that day, everyone was somber but carrying on with their jobs. I realized how short life was, and that I could not work for that company any longer. Shortly after, I put in my resignation to focus on my new business that I had just started. So that changed my life drastically.

It is hard to realize how very naive I was back then. I believed the news, I believed the 9/11 story. My husband and I did question the Pentagon; there was so much there that did not add up and it was quite obvious. But we shrugged it off. After all, why would they lie to us?!

NOW: 9/11 was orchestrated by the Cabal. There is no way around that. It was done to take our rights and liberties away. Sadly, they were successful.

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Sunshines09 2 points ago +2 / -0

It's crazy to think how just two years before this happened I had a relative who was flying internationally from US with a layover in Europe and had a kitchen knife set in his carryon. They pulled it out during inspection and asked why he had it. He said it was a gift (which was true) and they thought about it for a second and decided it was fine. Now I can't even bring a bottle of shampoo.

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blacksmith21 17 points ago +17 / -0

I was at home when my business partner called me from a NJ rest stop en route to NYC and he told me to turn on the TV. I did just in time to see the second plane hit. I stood and watched events unfold then the plane hit the Pentagon.

I had already been past the Pentagon early that morning, dropping my daughter off at pre-K about 1 mi from the Pentagon. Immediately, I realized the "war" had come to my doorstep. I grabbed my kit, armed up, and ran out to go retrieve my daughter. I had to take a different route as Rt 27 (Columbia Pike) was the road on the side of the Pentagon which was struck. It took 2 hours for me to make a 6 mile round trip.

All cell phones had been jammed or overloaded at this point. Getting in touch with anyone other than via land line was futile.

At this point, the towers had collapsed and the fate of people I knew at a company in the towers was becoming more clear. Status of friends of mine in the Pentagon was unknown. At that point, a future boss of mine was pulling people to safety in the Pentagon. My neighbor had just left his office which was decimated.

In total, about I knew about 15 people which had perished. I drove by the round hole in the side of the Pentagon for years, watching the reconstruction process. I listened to the conspiracy theorists, many on the left, who blamed the US government. Me, I blamed UBL and the Taliban for many years, supported Bush et al, until about 5 years ago when I fell down the rabbit hole.

At this point, I am all but convinced that the US government, run by the elites, in conjunction with foreign governments and transnational actors orchestrated an attack on its own citizens.

I pray that the truth about Sep 11 is exposed and the people realize what actually happened. That will be the true Great Awakening.

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operation_eland 2 points ago +2 / -0

I watch the whole thing happen on TV here in England after I got home from school that day. I was 12 at the time. I went down the rabbit hole back in 2006/2007 when I realised the war on terror was going so badly that it had to be by design. The more and more time goes back the less and less I am convinced about what my eyes saw on TV that day. The elites have the power to make you see and believe things that aren't real. I long for the day the real perpetrators of this crime are brought to justice. Sadly I think most of them will run out the clock just like the murderers of president Kennedy or those behind the lies that started the Vietnam war.

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nomadic [S] 16 points ago +16 / -0

Me personally -- I was on a weeklong field trip and getting close to this girl, hoping for the best. We all wake up on Tuesday morning, walk into the mess hall, and the cashier gestures to the TV showing the news, "As you can see, we've got a bit of a mess." And we all look up at the TV and everything changes.

The decision is made to enjoy the rest of the week and come home to a new world. When the bus gets back to school, our teacher says "Your parents are probably going to want to hug you more than usual," and he was right.

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NJHolyLand 1 point ago +1 / -0

Was that stupid and gay to you? The gooey emotion around it made me suspicious and angry. No one gave a fuck about America on 9/10

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Sc0paf 1 point ago +1 / -0

I think you're right, but it kinda makes sense. Traumatic event that made people open their eyes a little to what they were taking foregranted, maybe.

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NJHolyLand 1 point ago +1 / -0

Hah you know at best 1 in 7 process it that way

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deleted 16 points ago +17 / -1
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Dudemanfoo 15 points ago +15 / -0

Lots of flags for the following week.

20 years of people forgetting as the propagandists throw bread into the crowd at the circus.

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Greekish 15 points ago +15 / -0

I was in my UK home workshop with the TV on. Part of my business was repairing TVs so I always had the "news" on the TV currently under test. (I no longer own a TV nor live in the UK.) I witnessed the "planes" hitting the two towers; the BBC announcing the fall of building 7 before it happened; the whole works. Afterwards I did continuous research and collected dozens of videos (missile hitting the Pentagon; fake plane crash in a field, etc.)

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czarina123 14 points ago +14 / -0

I was at work and the TV was on at my desk. We saw the first announcements and then most of the office gathered round to watch the second tower go down. The day was surreal. I remember telling people they would blame Osama Bin Laden (I was already a budding conspiracy theorist at the time). People responded with "Who?".

9/11 was the event that finally forced me to swallow that red pill. I've been going down the rabbit hole ever since.

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Ratdog900 8 points ago +8 / -0

I was at work also surreal and I like most blamed Osama Had freinds tell me it was an inside job called them crazy said if our govt could kill 3000 Americans we are in big trouble Well I was wrong and we are I have since apologized to them all

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MEBLOCK 14 points ago +14 / -0

Someone popped in the office and told us a plane hit the WTC. We went in the internet (Webcrawler I think) and found some news but the internet was not what it is now in terms of real time videos, etc. We had a radio in our office. We turned it on and people gathered around to listen to the horror. I took a walk outside later. It was a beautiful morning where I was, blue skies and crisp. I could hear F16's scrambling since our ANG was one of the first on site. To think, it was so beautiful and peaceful where I was but not far south it was utter hell, was heartbreaking.

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RoosterHeadBad 3 points ago +3 / -0

Interesting enough, clear blue skies over the entire country. It was a beautiful Fall day weather wise.

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Lffm819 14 points ago +14 / -0

Was sitting in my Algebra class freshman year guy that was always interrupting class had been wandering the halls came back and said some plane flew into a building my teacher said “that’s not important right now algebra is” 20 minutes later got to French class and she had the news on and that became all of my classes for the rest of the week didn’t know what to think cuz up until that point I lived in a bubble and never paid any attention to anything in the news etc

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nomadic [S] 15 points ago +15 / -0

“that’s not important right now algebra is”

Impressive teacher energy.

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Ogcarvattack 13 points ago +13 / -0

Fast forward to 2021. Algebra isnt important right now fighting fascists is the only thing that matter.

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Nice_n_tangy 2 points ago +2 / -0

Algebra really helps in that regard, though.

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cherry_lollipop 4 points ago +4 / -0

I immediately went to:

A hospital? What is it?

It's a big building with patients, but that's not important right now.

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Flowers_for_Alger 2 points ago +2 / -0

SOLID reference Pede! Surely, you can't be serious??

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cherry_lollipop 4 points ago +4 / -0

I AM serious. And don't call me Shirley.

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Lffm819 1 point ago +1 / -0

Yea one of the worst teachers I ever had

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Yeetthedems 13 points ago +13 / -0

I was a 9 year old kid, at home since my mom homeschooled all of us. I remember her turning on the tv after getting a phone call. She turns it on with enough time to see the second tower hit. She’s collapsing to the floor bawling and as a nine year old I don’t understand her reaction. All I can truly remember is her on the floor crying really hard. I now think it’s because she was scared for all of us kids :(

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Sunshines09 3 points ago +3 / -0

I was in 5th grade (so maybe 11?) And the teachers at school decided not to say anything to us, we just saw them leave the classroom a lot and whisper. They didn't want to stress the kids out in case any of us had relatives in new York or something. I come home like normal and my mom is sitting in front of the TV very stressed out. I said something off hand, normal to her and she just started screaming "how do you not know what happened today?!" And just put me on the couch next to her to watch the news. I feel like she could have handled that better lol

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AtomicBlonde 10 points ago +10 / -0

I volunteered at Ground Zero in the days after 9/11. My friend and I drove down to New York and served meals to firemen in a food tent near the still smoking, devastated site. One day, a policeman who had come through the tent a few times asked us if we wanted to see Ground Zero for ourselves---and at a time when virtually no one had access to the site beyond the country’s politicians and tireless public safety teams. I remember that when he asked us we immediately put down whatever we were doing and followed him without saying much, but we knew we were being given unique access to something both tragic and historic--something few people would ever see and something we would never forget. We were aware that the scene would be etched into our dreams for the rest of our lives, and become a part of our own story. And I think we both wondered as we walked why he had chosen us. This policeman, who was now our guide, was solemn and dutiful---not at all using the moment he was leading us to for any other reason than to share it with us. It was clear that he wanted us to see it, wanted these two meal makers from the food tent to bear witness to something that he faced everyday. He led us up a street and through a police barricade and told us not to take any pictures and then we walked into Ground Zero--- us two young mothers from Massachusetts who hadn't been doing anything special on September 10th. To describe what we saw inside will always be impossible. It's everything you saw on TV, but it was the feeling inside the site that I remember most. Not the twisted steel and the abandoned plates of eggs on a restaurant table---but the feeling. There was this heavy silence, but it wasn't---at least to me---the silence of death but the silence of reverence. It was reverence. Even today---all these years later---that reverence is what I carry as the remnants from that day. It's a reverence for those who died, those who searched and rescued, those whose lives were touched so intimately by that tragedy. And I will remember how small I felt standing amongst the piles of steel and dust and leaving with my head bowed but with an incredible feeling of hope...that one day this hell would lead us to a place that has no rubble...

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ythehorses 2 points ago +2 / -0

Thank you for sharing, that is amazing.

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SOTUisFUBAR 9 points ago +9 / -0

I was at "the office" (Working for my BIL in his basement) in Falls Church when I heard a plane hit the towers. I was like, "Yeah, right." so I tuned in and sure enough, and just in utter disbelief and awe the building didn't topple over, even as it collapsed I was like WTF, how did it fall like that instead of over. As soon as I'd heard about the Pentagon hit, I ran to my car and headed down to see what I could see. They had the whole area closed off lickety split, by the time I got down Rt 50 to where I'd get off to go to the Pentagon they had it blocked off to the point I couldn't see it. I'm not sure the side hit and it's relation to Rt 50, but I don't recall seeing any fire or smoke.

Funny though, I'm sitting here this AM watching Real America's Voice Live and they were talking about unity and how it brought people together. You know, between today's 9/11 and 20 years ago 9/11. Well, the state we're in now is just saddening.

RIP & God Bless to all those that died in the collapses, and all those that have paid the ultimate price since.

God Bless us all, and God Bless The United States of America, give us strength, perseverance, and resolve to withstand the evil we're facing.

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ythehorses 4 points ago +4 / -0

The unity of the country after 9/11 is unforgettable. We turned into an amazing place, for a short while. It didn't take long for the Left to decimate that. Damn them.

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NJHolyLand 1 point ago +1 / -0

Retards hoodwinked by trauma and deceit is not unity.

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Scrunchie47 9 points ago +9 / -0

It was when I realized that the Deep State was firmly in control.

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PhDinNY 9 points ago +9 / -0

I worked about 6 blocks from the towers and when the first plane hit, I asked someone if it was like the 1st Twin Tower terrorist bombing, and they said no, I then asked if it could be an earthquake, and they didn't know. Then we saw the smoke and sparkly debris (I don't know if it was the foil on some sheet rock, or what, but the dust sparkled in the air) and heard that a plane hit a tower. It was a beautiful, clear day, and I thought, "why would a plane hit a building on such a nice day", I then asked, "Could this be a terrorist attack?". They didn't know, but we began to watch the live coverage on TV, and then the 2nd jet hit, and I was pretty sure it was terrorism then. I was getting ready to leave the building when an announcement came for us all to evacuate. Once on the street, I saw thousands at the City Hall park area standing motionless, staring at the burning towers. I saw some little wiggly things falling, and asked it it was people, someone said "Yes". At that point I was snapped out of the trance of staring at the spectacle and headed for the subway, which was eerily empty. I went straight to Grand Central to get my train home. On the train someone said the first tower had fallen. As the train was leaving Manhattan, the 2nd tower fell. I was fortunate enough to get one of the last trains off Manhattan, because all trains and I believe all the subways too, were stopped. I then spent days watching TV, hoping they would "get the people who did it!".

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lsvogel 8 points ago +8 / -0

We'd just purchased a new home and I'd just gotten our young kids on the school bus. I had FOX news on and my husband was still getting ready for his daily commute to work. I was shocked to see on the news the airplane hit the first tower. I quickly called my husband in and we were both shocked and in disbelief.

We watched the first tower burning, the horror and then the second tower was hit. Then even further destruction as the subsequent plane crash in PA and at the Pentagon. We decided to pick-up our kids from school, as we did not know the extent of these terrorist attacks. The school was jam packed with parents who, like me, thought the same thing.

We lived in the Wash DC area and it's ironic that just four months prior to 9-11, my husband had a DOD contract opportunity at the Pentagon. He had made the decision to take an alternative contract at a different DOD facility. Needless to say, that alternative DOD facility closed down completely on 9-11 as a safety measure.

FYI; My high school friend was a FOX reporter commentating live in NYC. He was covered in ashes from the first building collapse, but kept on reporting. Thanks to Rick Leventhal for his courageous reporting.

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BlowTorch 7 points ago +7 / -0

I had arrived home from NYC on 9/10. My mother and I were staying at the millennium Hilton at the wtc plaza, checked out around 9:00 am. Fast forward 24 hours.. I wake up and walk to the living room to see the buildings burning on tv. I saw the buildings we just marveled at from our room, I saw the towers that my mom had called “a huge fuckin target” the day before, falling apart with explosions. That fucked my head and heart up pretty good. I am piecing it together and seeing how this all brought me here today. I live in a blue city in a blue state and hardly have any friends anymore. Now I think I know what sets me apart. The feeling of nationally shared patriotism the following weeks filled the aching void. Maybe I became a junkie for American unity. United we stand, Divided we fall.

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Encognegro98ckun2qb 7 points ago +7 / -0

I was in the army with twin babies at the time. I was at the hair dresser when someone screamed “the plane hit the tower” as they ran in. I watched in horror and spent the next couple hours trying to reach my family on post and all the lines were jammed. That night was my friends birthday so we went to red lobster and it was empty with police everywhere. Very bad and sad day!

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BlaineBug 6 points ago +6 / -0

7th grade in middle school.

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Analophigus 6 points ago +6 / -0

I was in the 4th grade when Mr. Neufeld rolled the TV into our classroom. He turned the TV on to view the aftermath of the first tower. Our teacher said “kids this is history in the making right now. You will never forget this day.” And I never did. I don’t recall if we watched the 2nd plane strike the other tower or not, but I wouldn’t be surprised. I knew something terrible had happened in NY. A lot of people had died - when I got home my mom was in awe watching coverage on CNN at our house. She was glued to the tv and she had no words. She was scared, worried they would strike other areas. It was a very horrible day. Now that I am an adult I can only imagine the terror every parent felt for their child.

God bless the USA and all of the world. We have been fooled and owned for too long.

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Phishhed44 5 points ago +5 / -0

I was 20 years into my 30+ career in aviation electronics engineering that day and 11 had been with Boeing. With that experience I was dayshift supervisor in avionics on the United Boeing line at one of the largest third-party maintenance facilities in America. I had left Boeing to raise my children in North Carolina vs Seattle and was comfortably happy. I had all the instrument panels out of the flight deck of this United 737 and was “balls-deep” working on a weather radar waveguide mod and noticed the hangar floor was silent. Usually there’s constant rivet-gun & equipment noise unless it was break-time and it wasn’t. I stuck my head out the pilots window and could see no-one except the cute female United Rep jogging for her office door. I decided it was time for a smoke and I hung-out with her so I headed her way, but her office was locked. It never was...odd, so I headed for the avionics shop and still noticed on my way that nobody was on the floor anywhere. In the shop all the techs were surrounding a tv watching IT. I went home early and on my answering machine was a recording of one of my ex-Saudi Air Force trainees who had called to profusely apologize for Al-Qaeda’s actions, stating that his country-men were mourning with us...”you know we’re good people” he said and was crying. All these divergent pieces in my life were falling into place; United, 9/11 and my experience in Arabia. I spent the last decade of my career as a DoD Contractor working various programs IN Iraq and then Afghanistan supporting our troops. I missed a lot of my 3 children’s growing teen years but they were very proud of Dad and I was proud to serve the young troops with my experience. 9/11 is one small Chapter in my almost completed book. Yes, it now seems so effin misguided BUT WHO KNEW THE TRUTHS?!!! I would do it all over again to protect our young soldiers.

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GingerPatriot 2 points ago +2 / -0

How profound that your trainee would make it a point to call you and apologize...and now, knowing what we know...crazy

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Phishhed44 3 points ago +3 / -0

He was a mega-rich son of an Aramco executive and we would drive around Riyadh in his stretch opalesque-painted Mercedes like Princes. He was so proud of his American friend and for me it was like hanging with royalty. He was very intelligent as he wasn’t inbred, I’m sure his Father had a foreign wife. A really great friend. I got to go to his wedding...wow THAT was epic. Interestingly, on that day HE KNEW it was Al-Qaeda but most Americans had never heard the term. They had infiltrated the Saudi military and were regularly purged from the ranks. I recall one day at the AWACS hangar three AQ trainees were arrested right in the shop...they were scary-angry fuqqers.

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GingerPatriot 2 points ago +2 / -0

This is fascinating! I hate that the only thing I know of other countries has been spoon fed to me by the MSM. What was the wedding like? I truly love to hear first-hand accounts, they help to cover the picture that has been painted for me.

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Phishhed44 4 points ago +4 / -0

I spent a total of 12 years in the Mideast and many years in Africa, Central & South America. The main thing I took from all my experiences is PEOPLE ARE THE SAME EVERYWHERE. Full of love for family and friends, music, food and the desire for PEACE. Evil persists everywhere as well. So many can run-down the list of negatives concerning Arabs & Persians (muslims) but what about the positives? I listed the common themes globally above. When traveling abroad there’s a phrase “ugly Americans” that inevitably is heard. When you’re in a foreign land YOU MUST forget the American cultural norms and always try to leave a positive “taste” in a foreigner’s memory of Americans. Humans judge and pigeon-hole any foreigner as a group by their possibly only experience they have interacting with you. That makes US ALL a Diplomat as we travel. That’s key to remember. I’ve seen SO MANY Americans act like asses abroad that yeah, we earned that title as “ugly”. However, I was quite an exception in Saudi and made MANY friends and relished my experiences. I went to 2 Saudi weddings and often joined my trainees in desert cookouts/parties and often brought my young Son. He grew up loving soccer and a small group of us Boeing guys went to a USA/Saudi soccer match in Riyadh sitting next to the Royalty section we were a blob of color in a stadium of WHITE robes. I brought an air-horn and we totally stuck-out. The Princes loved it with everybody laughing kindly and mocking us as the Saudi team scored, and us going ballistic as Team-USA scored. A great memory. The weddings were opulent, even for poor or middle class Arabs as the groom’s family’s would petition Royalty for money to rent a “Wedding Palace” for the occasion. The women were separated to the other side of the Palace and my ex-wife went. Traditionally that’s where the single girls get completely “whored-up” in their dress and makeup...trying to impress the gaggle of Mothers shopping for brides for their sons. It’s just their culture. I dressed completely in Arab garb and with my Ray-Bans and cigarette hanging off my lip looked quite the part. Surrounded by my trainees, meeting their Fathers etc and being accepted into the fold was an immense feeling of kinship that’s hard to describe. I truly was a good Diplomat thereby erasing much of the “ugly American” moniker.

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GingerPatriot 2 points ago +2 / -0

Wow...this really speaks to me today! I think about this often, we only know what the t.v shows us, but these are human beings, just like me. There's a mother over there somewhere with the same or similar emotions, feelings & experiences as me. Do they hate us, if so, why? I've never been to another country but I agree with you, we should always be diplomats, we should always give a positive view and interaction. We should humbly respect their culture & traditions, as we would hope/expect foreigners to do in ours. What we could learn from each other....endless possibilities! No matter how you dice it, judging a group of people based on the evil acts of a few is irresponsible and ignorant. I really appreciate your outlook & I love to hear about experiences outside of this country, especially military since I have no experience with that either. As I read about the bullhorn my initial reaction was "oh no!" but...it was fun & you all enjoyed each other and laughed and had a great time! I guess I am still peeling away some layers of brainwashing, my reactions are ridiculous sometimes. This is a great eye opener for me, I think I'm awake...but there are some layers to remove yet. So, are you saying the royalty pays for extravagant weddings for the little people? Is the royalty also the ruling class? That is fascinating either way, I can't imagine asking our 'royalty' to pay for my wedding! Seriously thanks for sharing all of this, a whole new world for me & helping me to dig deeper and open my eyes wider

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Phishhed44 1 point ago +1 / -0

The Awakening can be painful too, as you undoubtedly know already. The ruling class in EVERY Nation “puts the global face” on it’s citizenry unfortunately. Just look how Biden et al has trashed our proud public face that Trump so REGALLY restored to us?! Anyway, yes certain Princes openly have the citizenry “petition” them for ALMS and a wedding is probably the most common. On certain holidays some palaces have lines of people waiting for their handout. I heard it’s almost always given but you literally have to approach the Royal and state your case. It’s not an abused system either...can you imagine spoiled-brat-lazy Americans with such a system? NOT. Anyway it’s how they “pay-back” the citizenry in a sense, as they reap the rewards of oil economy they repay; but with HONOR. They do cherish their customs and are a proud people at heart. It’s also how they don’t get overrun by said citizenry and become headless 😁

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Phishhed44 1 point ago +1 / -0

Let me add...at that soccer match Team USA WON. After our winning goal I went nuts jumping around blaring my air-horn THEN a Referee threw a flag and made a completely bogus call negating our winning goal. The Saudis ended-up winning on a penalty kick & IT WAS TOTALLY RIGGED. I think most of the stadium was pointing and laughing AT US...we were getting totally razzed and on the megatron screen looking like victims of public humiliation aka THEFT. So with all my diplomatic WINS erasing the “ugly American” moniker, the Arabs kept their reputation as THIEVES. That Referee probably would’a been castrated post-game if he hadn’t made that call...yeah.

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ChristineAnne 4 points ago +4 / -0

I was at Mass when the first plane hit. Everyone's beepers were going off. I went into the rectory and the television was on. We saw the second one hit. I told the rosary ladies who were in a tizzy. Then I went to the pier in Long Beach NY which was near my house. We always had a view of the towers from across the bay. People were gathered and a car radio was on giving a blow by blow. I called my husband who was at work on the bayfront not far from the pier. We heard the news say the buildings were collapsing and we watched in horror as they disappeared in a plume of dust.

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kayak 4 points ago +4 / -0

I clearly remember as the 2nd plane hit saying aloud: "Our world as we know it has forever changed."

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Aspie 4 points ago +4 / -0

I was at work in a major law firm. I heard about the first tower. Someone brought a TV cart into the breakroom and turned on the news. There was no cable, just local stations. I remember Katie Couric was on when the second tower was hit. She was just retarded, saying something like what a terrible coincidence that two planes accidentally hit the towers. I was watching the TV when the first tower dropped straight down like a professional demolition.

After work, I went home and tried to stay normal. I remember we had pork chops for supper, and then I worked on my computer some until bedtime. I wrote everything down in my daily notes so I would never forget.

I also later bought a DVD produced by CBS News with a lot of the news footage. I've never watched it. I might have to pull it out and see what's on it.

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KnottyJane 4 points ago +4 / -0

I saw the 2nd plane hit while I was getting ready for work. Drove to the office sobbing the whole way. The old veteran was the first person I saw and he tried to comfort me. We debated about whether to stay or go home. We all huddled around computers and TVs looking for news… one girl asked me to take her to pick up her kid from school and take them home, so I did. The old vet, George, called to check on me, several times. He knew I didn’t have family there, and my boyfriend (I moved to be with him) was out of town. He was my lifeline… he told me what was probably happening to keep us safe, reminded me that once I was out of the city I was probably safe. Offered to come sit with me. I thought he was rude and a dick most of the time but that day, the rest of the week, he was my rock. Not sure why he picked me but I was grateful. Everyone in the office was nicer, but he became my buddy after that, until the day I left.

I called my parents, 1200 miles away and asked them to help me move back home because nothing felt safe any more. It took a little over a month to make the arrangements but I broke it off with the guy I moved for, packed a trailer with all my stuff and drove across the country. Lived with my parents for about 6 months and then moved into the house where I am now.

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Electricolive 4 points ago +4 / -0

21 years old. I was the baby of the family still living with mom. I woke up to get ready for work when my mother was watching the news, she told me a plane had crashed into the tower. We were glued to the TV talking about all the poor people that were clearly trapped. We watched the second plane hit and we knew right away America was under attack, I freaked out and called my best friend, woke her ass up quick.i called into work and she and I talked on the phone all day speculating. The worst part was watching a man in the fiery part of the building throw out a rope made of bedsheets or tablecloths or something and he started scaling the building to get to the lower floors. He lost his grip and fell...it was devastating watching the real time death by fire or death from jumping choices being made.

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momster2 4 points ago +4 / -0

(((Big Hugs))) and lots of love and kindness to all on this day of remembrance.

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Stillwater 3 points ago +3 / -0

I had just started my senior year of high school and was in the living room with my dad before leaving for school. He flipped on the tv and we both stared in horror for a bit before he goes “I bet it’s that damn Bin Laden!” and ran off to wake up my mom. As a lot of other posters have said, my whole day at school was just quietly watching the news from one class to the next.

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Ogcarvattack 3 points ago +3 / -0

Making a left to go to class at a community college. Listening to talk radio. Class canceled.

Sinking, despair, and dread. Next days empty skys.

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HunnyB 3 points ago +3 / -0

I was at work it was on the radio in the break room. I remember listening and crying my eyes out. Absolutely horrifying, didn't know what was next.

I remember talking to New Yorkers I can't remember if it was 2001 or 02 they were ordering air purifiers. I worked for The Sharper Image back then. But they told me how horrible it was, and how bad the air quality was for them. It was a very sobering time.

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PhDinNY 1 point ago +1 / -0

The Federal building where I worked was shut down for a couple of weeks. When we went to work back there, I had a towel hanging in my office that absorbed the ground zero smell, because some nimrods let the building AC system keep running when all the smoke from ground zero was all over lower Manhattan, so everything made of cloth had that smell. I should have just kept it that way, but I brought it home to wash.

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HunnyB 1 point ago +1 / -0

Yeah I remember feeling so helpless that I couldn't do more. I gave free overnight shipping, and listened to their stories it was all I could do.

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NJHolyLand 2 points ago +2 / -0

I was woken up at my dorm in Philly by my girlfriend calling: from North jersey, fam in NY but not Manhattan. My roommate picked up and said she was on the phone and a synopsis. I said "what? Who gives a shit?!" And went back to sleep. Woke up around 11. No one on T.OTSE. had posted about it so i said the obvious, mossad foreign policy goals false flag bullshit, why are retards getting hyped like trigger goyim.

Gf calls again, she lived w her iwo jima vet grandfather, says she's joining the Marines. She had the entire next 8 years of propaganda already uploaded, it was insanely terrifying to hear the grip of madness and how precisely the exact narrative was so implanted already. I spent like 2 hours talking her back to reality. This is a girl who was like a 90s black metal nazi, fully ideological, well educated in real history. All gone after one morning of clever programming. Well for 2 hours, i talked her back to the real world.

Some background about me, my grandpa was JBS in the 60s and i knew all about the subversion since childhood, so shit like 9/11 only ever registered to me as plots and cabal bullshit. I only cared about what they were trying to sneak in against me and the Republic.

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Maryaha 2 points ago +2 / -0

I was sitting at my desk in the Mary Kay building in Dallas, watching everything unfold. It was surreal. Not long before 911, a big old building in Dallas was being demolished to make way for a new building. I watched the demolition and was fascinated by how it fell right down in its own footprints, causing no damage to anything nearby. When I watched the Twin Towers fall down in their own footprints, I knew without a doubt that it was a controlled demolition too. I didn't know why or who was responsible, but I never believed the official story. Here we are 20 years later, and I am glad that so many more people no longer believe the lies. Unfortunately, there are many people, even those who know that the government lies to them every single day, still believe the official story. If you try to tell them they have been fooled, they will call you unamerican or worse. People still believe that an airplane can bring down a 110-story building.😏

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CaptainQuip 2 points ago +2 / -0

I was working in a mom and pop restaurant with a franchise brand name. All the help and customers were glued to the TVs, mouths agape . There was an audible group gasp when the second plane hit. Not too many people finished their meals that day.

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Trumponium 2 points ago +2 / -0

At work about to head home, heard the first plane go in on the Howard Stern show...thought it was a cesna or private plane and thought what a dumbass. Then second plane hit and knew immediately that it was an attack and thought world war 3 was about to happen. Rest of the day was in a daze and depressed going on acting auditions and everyone handling the different auditions were in great spirits which thought was weird.

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MudDog 2 points ago +2 / -0

i slept through it (no where near NYC), but dreamt that two planes had struck tall buildings in Chicago. still trips me out

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TheYellowstone 2 points ago +2 / -0

I was in the 5th grade. Our teacher wouldn't tell us what was going on. No outside recess. School was let out early, and my mom came and picked me up. She was crying, and I don't remember exactly what she said but probably "something really bad happened."

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GingerPatriot 2 points ago +2 / -0

My story isn't as riveting as many of these accounts, I heard snippets on the radio during my 45 minute commute to work. When I got to work everyone was packed in the break room watching the news on TV. On the drive I I was confused, assumed it was a really bad joke or something. I just wanted to mention how many of these accounts talk about being glued to the news that day. We depended on journalists to keep us informed. I had no idea at the time we might not be getting the truth. This event is what began to open my eyes.

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GradyKayy 1 point ago +1 / -0

My story is exactly the same, except I wasn’t listening to the radio on my drive in that morning. I found out about what happened once I got to the office. The first tower had just been hit, and the TV news reporters still thought it was a private small plane. We all were glued to the TV that day— I remember the Executive Assistant to the CEO making several calls with the travel agency the company used, because the CEO, and several other Execs and sales people were traveling and needed to scramble to rent cars to get back home. (All planes were grounded, and other accommodations were going fast with all of the people switching their travel plans.) She also came around to everyone to left them know the status of our colleagues who were traveling. All were safe, but it took them several days to all get back.

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Infidel440 2 points ago +2 / -0

I was in A.I.T in the army at Fort Gordon, GA. We were in an electronics class when someone came running in our classroom and said a plane just hit the World Trade Center. We stopped class and went to a common room where a tv was. We watched in horror as the other “plane” hit and then the subsequent falling of the towers. The base went on full alert and lock down and we thought we were all gonna be pulled out of training to go to war.

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FiercePatriot 2 points ago +2 / -0

Chaos trying to locate my husband who worked downtown. I was an aide in a class in Huntington NY and got a message handed to me asking if my husband was ok. I figured something happened on the Long Island Railroad. By the time I got out of my classroom, pandemonium was happening in the halls. I asked what’s going on?? The answer: the trade towers were attacked. The towers went down. I couldn’t wrap my brain around that. My memory? Kneeling on the sidewalk outside the school trying to reach my husband and noticed what a beautiful day, with a crystal blue sky 😢. I got hold of my husband, he was staying in his office with 2 friends. It was too pitch black to see to walk. They decided to wait it out in their office. He made it home walking over the Brooklyn bridge and got a ride from a Good Samaritan. When he got home he was covered in white ash. We didn’t know then what all of it meant. We do now. Never forget.

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greatgonzochops 2 points ago +2 / -0

I was 22 years old. Living with a buddy at B206... That was a crazy time in my life to say the least. We were HEAVY partiers.. I can't remember why we did it but we desided to actually "pray". Not something we would normally ever fucking do. We held hands, my buddy gave a beautiful, heart felt prayer, we fucking ment it too.. Next morning, towers came down..

I know, I know... But still! :)

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Callmejuls 2 points ago +2 / -0

I was making breakfast for my kids for school and before that day I had no knowledge or awareness of the twin towers or al quaida. I remember bawling my eyes out as I watched it happening live, praying to God for help for those people who were in the towers and calling my husband at Boeing to tell him. It was horrifying and heartbreaking.

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BigsmokeyTXwolf 1 point ago +1 / -0

1st grade, teachers stopped teaching and turned on the news. Not much else I remember being afraid that something else was gonna happen.

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LordCabillo 1 point ago +1 / -0

Was in college. Me and a friend woke up around 11 as usual, and went to school. The place was a ghost town. Literally nobody else there. We walked around for about 30 minutes before giving up, and going back home to play video games. Didn’t realize what happened until late in the day

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Striker1 1 point ago +1 / -0

It was a crystal clear beautiful blue sky day. I was running and there was this odd stillness. That was around 7:30am.

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BuckeyestuckinCA 1 point ago +1 / -0

At the time we were living in Ohio. I had just put my daughter on the school bus and turned on the TV. I didn't usually watch the morning news shows, but that day I turned on "The Today Show" moments before they broke in with the news about the first plane hitting the first tower.

My husband was in the Anaheim, California, area on business and was to fly from Orange County to San Jose that morning. As he usually did, he called me shortly before boarding the plane, and as we were talking I saw the second plane hit the tower. He immediately said it was terrorism. His plane did board, and at first they were delayed. He was on the phone with me again with the pilot came on and told the passengers that there had been attack in New York, that two planes had hit the WTC, and they probably weren't going anywhere any time soon. They deplaned a short time later and picked up their bags from baggage claim. My husband decided to go back to the hotel he had checked out of that morning and got on the hotel shuttle. This particular hotel happened to be a hotel where American and United Airlines crews would stay, so he was on the shuttle with crew from both airlines. Many were in tears and one pilot said that he knew the pilots had to be killed because they wouldn't give up control of the planes without a fight.

After an hour or so, my husband made the decision to rent a car and drive up to San Jose. He got one of the last available cars and ended up staying in San Jose until September 21.

My daughter, who was 8 at the time, remembers coming home from school, getting off the bus, and me hugging her tightly while crying.

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meowkitcat123 1 point ago +1 / -0

Our family was living in Karachi and as a kid we were watching it unfold live on TV with our family friend. We were expats and could not believe what we were seeing. My parents looked at their friends without saying a word but with the expression that everything would change forever. We had to evacuate ASAP getting letters from the embassy on a daily to get out of Pakistan