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NeuroticFisherman 1 point ago +1 / -0

Freedom of and from religion includes all religions as well as none. 🤷‍♂️

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NeuroticFisherman 0 points ago +1 / -1

Please don't give people medicine without their knowledge of what it is. I thought a huge argument against the vaccines was the lack of informed consent? So is the same with you giving people ivermectin without them knowing what it is. You never know when people may be taking other medications or supplements, or if they were to have a truly random heart attack or something and need to inform paramedics of anything they've taken. Not to mention just the basic principle that people should fully know what they're taking and putting into their bodies. I don't care how safe ivermectin may be. I take some arthritis meds that make it so I can't take Advil or Aleve without huge problems. You never know what people may be taking and what sort of reactions may occur even with the safest of medications.

-5
NeuroticFisherman -5 points ago +2 / -7

They have in fact isolated and documented the covid genome of different variants. It's the same as reading and saving the human genome, or the flu, or bacteria, or any other organism. There's multiple journal articles from multiple countries about isolating the virus and saving the genome. Then they do the same with people who are sick and compare the genomes. This is pretty basic biological science stuff.

We isolated virus from nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal specimens, and characterized the viral sequence, replication properties, and cell culture tropism. We found that the virus replicates to high titer in Vero-CCL81 cells and Vero E6 cells in the absence of trypsin. We also deposited the virus into two virus repositories, making it broadly available to the public health and research communities.

From the US: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7239045/

From Korea: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7045880/

From Turkey: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32936826/

From Australia: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32237278/

1
NeuroticFisherman 1 point ago +4 / -3

I've been told over and over on this site by so many people that covid has never been isolated or sequenced ever. Of course this is wrong, but now everyone is chomping at the bit to use the sequenced genome as evidence of lab creation. People need to have a better grasp of basic biology if you're arguing things like this. Of course the genome was sequenced, and it happens quickly and a long time ago for COVID-19. Sequencing a genome is not new technology at all, and is really simple to do anymore. If you can't grasp basic biology, people won't believe anything you say on the topic. And when I'd bring this issue up and showed multiple scientific journal articles about sequencing the genome, from many journals and from around the world, people would continue to dig their heels in and not accept the information right in front of them.

Sorry for the rant, not really directed at you specifically, but it's frustrating to see anons push and argue key topics about covid when they refuse to learn about the basic biology and what we're capable of doing.

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NeuroticFisherman 3 points ago +3 / -0

No, this kinda time frame is pretty typical honestly. You may wait 2-4 months after a verdict to have sentencing, depending on how busy and backed up the court system that's dealing with the case is.

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NeuroticFisherman 0 points ago +1 / -1

Lawsuits may fly, but I'm doubtful any would really be successful. There's very little worker protections in the US. Legal structures and courts often take a corporation's side against workers, and there's very little legal protection or recourse that employees can take against their employer. This is all by design too. This will fall under the fact that companies can create nearly any requirements or policies for their own employees as long as they are not discriminatory against a protected class.

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NeuroticFisherman 0 points ago +1 / -1

You can buy a lot more food or other useful stuff to live from the profits of selling a nice TV or new XBOX than you could take out at least in a couple shopping carts full of food.... Which is easier and quicker to take for the most potential benefit?

(Just pointing out the flaw in your comment.)

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NeuroticFisherman 1 point ago +2 / -1

The private company mandate was found unconstitutional because it was so broad, being every company with over 100 employees. SCOTUS said that OSHA could still mandate vaccination for certain work places where there lots of close, in person contact like manufacturing, or office work. A more targeted OSHA rule may have survived the court challenge. They also said that such a mandate would have been fine if it was an act of Congress and not an OSHA rule.

And regarding healthcare workers, it's not exactly all healthcare workers exactly, it's all healthcare workers at facilities that receive Medicaid or Medicare funding. It's been found constitutional many time before that when the federal government gives out money to programs or entities, that the federal government can put rules or stipulations on the use of that money. The thing is that Medicaid and Medicare coverage makes up a huge amount of people being seen by doctors or other healthcare facilities. So it's essentially impossible for a healthcare facility to exist and be viable without accepting Medicaid and Medicare funding. Therefore, it's kind of def facto all healthcare workers, even though the rule doesn't single out healthcare workers as a whole, just healthcare workers employed by facilities that accept government payments, ie all medical facilities.

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NeuroticFisherman 3 points ago +3 / -0

I've been told by so many people here that the covid virus has never been isolated or sequenced. However, it's obvious that the genome has been sequences if they're using it to compare and find something like this. People here need to have at least a basic understanding of biology, and that sequencing a virus genome is a piece of cake. If they haven't isolated the covid virus and genome, then the information of this post is true fake news.

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NeuroticFisherman 6 points ago +7 / -1

Biden literally can't close gitmo because it would take an act of Congress to close it. It's similarly why Obama couldn't close it as well. It would take 66 senators agreeing to close it. So even though Democrats control both houses of Congress, they don't have enough numbers in the Senate to pass something to close gitmo. And the Republicans love pushing the military industrial complex, so they wouldn't ever vote with Democrats to close gitmo.

3
NeuroticFisherman 3 points ago +4 / -1

It's not unconstitutional because it's a mandate, it's unconstitutional because the mandate was through OSHA, which the court ruled doesn't have authority over broad public health measures and the order was too broad. The ruling actually would still allow OSHA to mandate vaccines for jobs that may present more risk to workers of getting covid, like close quarters manufacturing, food processing, office workers who work close together, things like that. And a mandate for all citizens would have been legal if Congress had passed it instead of Biden authorizing the mandate through OSHA according to the supreme court's decisions.

0
NeuroticFisherman 0 points ago +1 / -1

Airlines are a whole different ball game. Flying on an airline is not a protected right in the Constitution. They can require all sorts of stuff in order to fly with them. They make you remove your shoes and remove your belt after all. The legal argument could also be that wearing a mask does not have any lasting or not reversible effects like getting a vaccine would. It's all separate regulations anyway, and today's court cases have nothing to do with flying with airlines.

1
NeuroticFisherman 1 point ago +2 / -1

I'm curious what the religious objection is to getting covid tests? I'm not well versed in some forms of Christianity, so I'm wondering on what basis could one claim an exemption with religious reasoning for why they shouldn't be tested that could potentially hold up for their determination?

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NeuroticFisherman 1 point ago +2 / -1

Healthcare brings in a ton of money from the federal government through Medicaid and Medicare. It's been a long standing rule they the government can apply certain standards or rules for any healthcare center that can then receive payments from Medicaid and Medicare. And since such a large segment of people who are sick and need constant healthcare, old people or people on disability is a big one, it's basically impossible for a healthcare center to exist without accepting Medicaid and Medicare payments. So it's not exactly a rule for all healthcare workers, but rather a rule for all organizations that take money from the federal government through those programs, which, in the end, is basically all healthcare workers and long-term care facilities.

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NeuroticFisherman 0 points ago +1 / -1

I doubt any would be effective. Any companies that fired workers over the mandates did so because they made it a company policy that their workers must be vaccinated or perhaps wear a mask and undergo testing or be terminated. I'm not even sure the OSHA mandate ever went fully into legal effect. Companies can still have such policies too, so just because the mandate doesn't exist doesn't mean some companies won't continue to have vaccine and testing policies on the books. They're free to make their own corporate policies and so some may continue to have such policies even without the mandates requiring them to. Regardless of the arguments at hand, it has generally come down to an issue of employees not complying with company policy, which is legally a valid reason to fire an employee. So yeah, I'm not really sure any lawsuits could get very far. Besides, most of the court systems hugely side with corporations over any sort of worker's rights or protections when it comes down to it, even something like this.

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NeuroticFisherman 1 point ago +2 / -1

No worries, thanks. :) And yes, despite my shitty health I have had good experiences in life and am glad I am around to live it (usually lol). It can certainly get me down at times, and the eternal fatigue and pain can make life a real hassle... But if I had to determine either not suffer those things and not exist, or be here in life as I am now, then I'd still choose to be existing. Doesn't mean it's easy, but my health problems aren't as bad as some people's at least.

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NeuroticFisherman 1 point ago +2 / -1

Oh, my mistake. When I saw AZT I use a search engine for azathioprine and HIV and found some results discussing the two together, so I just assumed they were referencing azathioprine.

1
NeuroticFisherman 1 point ago +2 / -1

HIV is also a retrovirus though, so it can do that. Other retroviruses would be able to behave similarly. That's a rather distinct form of life and is more the exception than the rule for everything else out there.

1
NeuroticFisherman 1 point ago +2 / -1

Evolution sometimes gets things wrong. I'm fact it usually does. It doesn't necessarily create peak performing organisms, but rather an organism that works well enough to survive and reproduce. Everything else doesn't really matter and is all based on random mutations and survival pressures. Just because something has evolved for billions of years doesn't mean it's perfect. Many species have and continue to go extinct over the life of the Earth.

I've had autoimmune issues for a lot of my life, it's genetic, both my parents and at least a couple grandparents also have/had autoimmune issues, as does my sister, so it's not just some new environmental thing, it's genetics. In this case, it's not life threatening, so it doesn't directly effect my ability to survive and reproduce, it just makes life really shitty. But from the point of evolution, quality of life doesn't matter, only the need to survive and reproduce. So I'm stuck with a shitty immune system, shitty quality of life, chronic pain, etc. Same thing with the need for eye glasses. It's a really shitty thing for an organism to not be able to see correctly. But generally it doesn't cause death if you can't see perfectly, at least not since the days of Hunter gatherer societies. But evolution still ended up with some of us having shitty genetics that leads to needing eye glasses.

Anyway, sorry for the long response, but I've studied evolution and biology a good bit, so thought I'd share.

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NeuroticFisherman 2 points ago +2 / -0

It's not even necessarily needing in the way you imply. Evolution is based on completely random mutations that happen at random times and amounts. If there's only a certain new type of food that's available, either a random mutation happens to come along that randomly allows the organisms to eat this new stuff, or they all die out and go extinct. There's no set progression or driver of evolution, though there can be pressures that cause organisms with certain mutations to live or die more frequently. If the organism can live and reproduce more with a certain random mutation in its genome, then those organisms continue to breed and the mutation takes over in the population.

This means that the fewer people who are infected with covid, be they vaxxed or not, the less chance for these random mutations there is, and less of a chance for more or different variants. And if infections are running rampant in more people, there's more replication of the virus overall, therefore more chances for a random mutation in the replication process to occur. More random mutations, more of a chance for something bad to happen with a variant. And while it's generally true that viruses mutate in order to spread the most, which includes keeping the host alive enough to keep replicating and spreading the virus, there's no guarantee that a random mutation won't come along that causes other weird symptoms, or can create more long term health problems. Because even if the host survives and spreads the virus, it doesn't care if the host is ok or negatively affected in the process, as long as he virus can continue to replicate and spread.

Sorry for the long-winded response, but I thought I'd share some insight.

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NeuroticFisherman 1 point ago +1 / -0

He always uses a fat sharpie when writing or signing his name. He even used it when signing executive orders or laws when typically fountain pens are used.

1
NeuroticFisherman 1 point ago +1 / -0

People who aren't vaxxed may still have their jobs at risk. A vaccine requirement may also be just a company policy at many companies anymore, even if there's no OSHA rule. Any company has the freedom to create their own policies, and that may or may not include the requirement to have had the covid vaccine. In some ways the genie may be out of the bottle, and some companies believe mandating vaccines per company policy will keep their workforce from getting sick as often or too severely so workers would in theory be more productive.

1
NeuroticFisherman 1 point ago +1 / -0

Doubtful. Those are city and/or state regulations, and not directly related to the OSHA mandate for companies with more than 100 workers.

1
NeuroticFisherman 1 point ago +2 / -1

They have in fact isolated and documented the covid genome of different variants. It's the same as reading and saving the human genome, or the flu, or bacteria, or any other organism. There's multiple journal articles from multiple countries about isolating the virus and saving the genome. Then they do the same with people who are sick and compare the genomes. This is pretty basic biological science stuff.

We isolated virus from nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal specimens, and characterized the viral sequence, replication properties, and cell culture tropism. We found that the virus replicates to high titer in Vero-CCL81 cells and Vero E6 cells in the absence of trypsin. We also deposited the virus into two virus repositories, making it broadly available to the public health and research communities.

From the US: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7239045/

From Korea: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7045880/

From Turkey: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32936826/

From Australia: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32237278/

1
NeuroticFisherman 1 point ago +2 / -1

So Trump is spreading misinformation about the 2020 election? Why would he be doing that?

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