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43
Azorca 43 points ago +43 / -0

We may never know. But lately, I question everything and trust no one. Cui Bono.

17
TSearch [S] 17 points ago +17 / -0

Agreed

18
BigDaddy1reboot 18 points ago +18 / -0

Supply and demand historically drive prices. Inflation is the result of too many dollars chasing too few goods. Government creates inflation by printing more money out of thin air. The inflation rate by Government is around 2-3% per year, meaning your dollar loses 2-3% buying power every year. That is long term inflation. Short term inflation can be caused by manufacturing cost increases, such as spikes in fuel costs. The Dolt-in-Chief has caused diesel prices to increase by 250% in his illustrious presidential career thus far. Covid lockdowns affected manufacturing of products, which is why there are certain shortages now. Simple advice is "Buy only what you need, and skip the rest." Eventually the manufacturing/delivery/retail process will correct itself.

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TSearch [S] 17 points ago +17 / -0

Sage advice.

One thing that has struck me for almost two years now is what seems to be a concerted effort to push a scarcity narrative. And, in turn, push panic buying, which likely feeds into the Federal Government taking some kind of action.

How many times have we seen posts with pics of empty grocery shelves? Several months ago, maybe a year, there was a video posted with a mid 50’s white guy claiming he knew Senior Military Officers who were told to stock up on food. The guy had glowie written all over him.

Yes, I am well stocked to feed my family for months if needed. But I never engaged in panic buying.

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Litecola2 18 points ago +18 / -0

The advice to stock up didn't seem glowie b/c the feebs were focused on incitement to violence, not prepping. Prepping would not help their narrative, it would only get thinking people on the road to self-sufficiency.

Now consider this - what program was given to the TV watchers at the beginning of the plandemic? Toilet paper - what an odd thing to hoard, right? If you wanted to prove that a subliminal would work, you need something harmless but obvious, not the usual milk-and-bread panic buying. I believe that test was successful and paved the way for the "safe and effective" and other programmed lines we've heard parroted from the TV watchers for more than two years now.

The prepared folks won't be in a panic now, but the TV watchers will be very antsy soon. Especially in the cities, where there are no pantries / larders / basements... it will only take one event right before midterms, and- martial law.

6
MordenGeist 6 points ago +6 / -0

Nailed it. This is exactly what I've been telling those in my circle since that TP rush went to crazy levels. 🤪

4
AtomicBlonde 4 points ago +4 / -0

This was an excellent comment. This is why I come here.

3
MuckeyDuck 3 points ago +3 / -0

Read this story by ex-Navy Seal Matt Bracken. "When the music stops." I think there are many factors in Matt's hypothetical story would play out in reality.

The bases of the story is:

"It’s estimated that the average American home has less than two weeks of food on hand. In poor minority areas, it may be much less. What if a cascading economic crisis, even a temporary one, leads to millions of EBT (electronic benefit transfer) cards flashing nothing but ERROR? This could also be the result of deliberate sabotage by hackers, or other technical system failures."

But this same flashpoint could be brought about in a number of ways including food shortages in the inner-cities.

u/TSearch u/MordenGeist u/AtomicBlonde
u/pente1776

3
VetforTrump 3 points ago +3 / -0

It's no joke.

1
pente1776 1 point ago +1 / -0

My brother does his own research as he makes his investment decisions. Months before the toilet paper hording he called and said it was coming. He warned the entire family. He had enough that he mailed some to his son on the west coast.

Unless you want to wipe your ass with your hand, toilet paper is not a strange thing to hoard. It's the obvious thing.

1
MuckeyDuck 1 point ago +1 / -0

Remember the parody words to the tv show theme song Branded.

Stranded, stranded on the toilet bowl,
What do you do when you're stranded,
And you can't find a roll?

To prove you're a man
you must wipe with your hand!

Stranded!

1
Litecola2 1 point ago +1 / -0

That's a weird decision because there was no paper shortage. And it was never a hoarding target above milk, bread, bottled water before. When we asked people why they were buying that first above what most would consider essential items, they blanked. They could not explain the compulsion.

Noting also it hasn't happened since.

8
KekistaniMemeLord 8 points ago +8 / -0

Yep, I haven't noticed any empty shelves other than the panic buying of toilet paper during covid and my local chipotle ran out of lids for the bowls and black beans once.

Lmao that's pretty much all the shortages I've seen. Gotta wonder how much of this is just smoke and mirrors.

2
Ddrake517 2 points ago +2 / -0

I think that's what's up with the bird flu. First they cull our checkens then they tell us not to feed the wild birdsnunder the guide it will spread. My thought is so wild birds feed in the wild won't spread it? Come on

3
TSearch [S] 3 points ago +3 / -0

I’ve worked around chicken laying operations,. How are wild birds spreading a virus to chickens in a contained building? Sure, a small sparrow might find a way to get in, but something doesn’t seem right about this story.

2
Phishhed44 2 points ago +2 / -0

Their lies are weak as they hardly even try to obviscate any longer? It would be laughable if it weren’t such a serious subject?!

5
Litecola2 5 points ago +5 / -0

So, it's both. And supply and demand stopped being natural many years ago, probably even before the petroleum "fossil fuel" / limited resource hoax was dreamed up.

3
Aspie 3 points ago +3 / -0

Russian scientists said years ago that crude oil is generated by some natural process deep in the earth.

Here's a test that anyone willing to do research can perform. Go online or to any other source and find out the basic elements contained in crude oil. Then find out the basic elements contained in your average animal or plant. You'll see differences enough to prove that oil doesn't come from dead dinosaurs or plants.

1
Litecola2 1 point ago +1 / -0

True! Scientists have tried to prove out a biochemical pathway for petroleum formation and no one has found a plausible one yet. They get closer with algae as a source, but still not the whole process.

Where long time oil guys will tell you that it always comes back.

3
Datadude 3 points ago +3 / -0

War of 1812 and it's aftermath, saw the start of market manipulation where the government started "command and control" of resources for "governments agenda". Manifest destiny was the pitch to justify acquisitions of the nations present and future resources. Right or Wrong, it was a major divergent from the free market, and the underlying cause of many struggles between fed and state and private interest.

2
BigDaddy1reboot 2 points ago +2 / -0

True, but producers will always pass costs along to consumers, so when fuel prices go up, the price of the product rises commensurately.

3
buzzsaw3364 3 points ago +3 / -0

Supply and demand is old school brainwashing.

3
BigDaddy1reboot 3 points ago +3 / -0

Perhaps, but it is still a driving force in certain areas. Take the used car industry for example. Used cars are selling way above KBB due to lack of availability. In a grocery store with fixed prices, it doesn't apply, except when the stores react to the run, on say TP, and raise the prices to dissuade the hoarders.

1
Litecola2 1 point ago +1 / -0

Maybe, sort of... Stores limit how many items one family can purchase even when their shelves are full, because they follow orders from central corporate. Used cars are fairly unregulated so yes I would believe they show more directly a supply and demand curve set.

2
we_let_this_happen 2 points ago +2 / -0

it won't correct itself until they quit trying to control it. And that means alot of socialist controllers are going to lose money. that not gonna happen like we are now

1
HermitAu 1 point ago +1 / -0

Irresponsibly printing currency tends to lead to the type of inflation we're currently seeing and the hyperinflation that's likely to come but the 2-3% "regular inflation" has to exist in our current economic system simply because of the Federal Funds Rate and the fact that interest is paid every time currency is borrowed by banks. The whole thing is a ponzi scheme funded by the hardworking masses.

3
y000danon 3 points ago +3 / -0

I think the US paradigm of money is entirely sick. Of course the obvious currency issues and central banking - past that we allow our money to speculation along the entire supply chain.

By that let’s compare US Defense spending to Russia.

We make overcomplicated things that cost to much for what they are.

Russia makes shit dead simple, as practical as possible, with cheap simple ways tk manufacture. The result is they spend less and have a more formidable footprint.

What we get for our money has to be a focus.

12
10lbsBass 12 points ago +12 / -0

Inflation! Look at how much money has been printed in the last 2 years. Hyperinflation is coming.

5
TSearch [S] 5 points ago +5 / -0

Yes, a lot of money has been created, but is it actually chasing to few goods? Or is it sitting in the coffers of the ultra rich? And flowing overseas to end up in the DS war chest?

The economy is not overheating, consumer demand is not at historic highs, so where does that leave us?

5
10lbsBass 5 points ago +5 / -0

I can not believe you are arguing about this. lol. Hyperinflation is coming. Make sure you have physical Gold and Silver.

2
TSearch [S] 2 points ago +2 / -0

We can debate about where the money is really going and whether or not it will cause runaway inflation. We won’t change each other’s minds. But something is coming.

What is coming is a reckoning and nothing can stop it. NCSWIC

1
10lbsBass 1 point ago +1 / -0

Absolutely.

0
ChronicMetamorphosis 0 points ago +4 / -4

For all that talk about "your mind being a magnet", and thoughts creating your own reality, you sure are buying into the fear porn right now.

Why aren't you practicing what you preach to everyone on this forum if you believe it works so well?

4
10lbsBass 4 points ago +4 / -0

I am not afraid at all. I am prepared. Telling the truth about what is about to happen is not negative thinking. The dollar has to hyperinflate in order to destroy the FED. That is a positive thing. Have you not read the Q posts?

-5
ChronicMetamorphosis -5 points ago +1 / -6

Ah I see, so in that case no matter how hard I think positively with my mind, it can't override a hard underlying reality.

The cultists always flip flop when it suits their needs. Especially when it gives them a chance to wave a finger at someone else.

I don't wish ill on you, but I hope the precipice shocks you out of their silly programming.

2
10lbsBass 2 points ago +2 / -0

Whatever happens, happens for good. https://youtu.be/7BMZbAV-YdE

2
ChronicMetamorphosis 2 points ago +2 / -0

Look up Helen Schucman and MKUltra.

Once this crap started going into schools, I had to put a lot of broken kids back together when they came out.

When the boot come crashing down on you, remember that its "all for good".

"aNd So It iZ 🤪"

0
Ddrake517 0 points ago +1 / -1

Yeah, the last time I knew stores aren't weighing our good/silver and testing it to make sure its real. They wouldn't have a clue. Today I bought a water barrel ½ off. The normal price was $129 and the cashier asked me how much that would be. If I tried to buy something with a gold inguot, they'd laugh their ass off. So yeah that may work once the economy comes back up but I say no, bartering is the way to go. Stock up or learn a skill. Think about it.

1
10lbsBass 1 point ago +1 / -0

Gold and Silver have been used as money for thousands of years. Think about it.

1
Ddrake517 1 point ago +1 / -0

In agree. I just don't think they are practical nor do I think our retail system can support it. Ie: 16 yo employees at such places as McDonald's?

1
10lbsBass 1 point ago +1 / -0

We won't be carrying Gold and Silver around with us. Our currency will be backed by Gold /Silver and will be redeemable for physical metal. That way currency can not be printed out of thin air and used to control the world as it has been since Nixon removed the Gold window in 1971.

When this happens there will be a revaluation of Gold and Silver and those that are holding it at the time will be very happy. Those that don't hold it will not be able to get it because it will be snatched up by the people paying attention, which is happening right now.

2
Ddrake517 2 points ago +2 / -0

Now this I agree with!

1
Phishhed44 1 point ago +1 / -0

Funny you mentioned that, I was JUST looking at empty barrels a couple days ago & yep, that’s about the going price.

2
Aspie 2 points ago +2 / -0

I don't know about you, but my personal consumer demand is through the roof. Because of high prices and obvious shortages in stores, I'm buying all I'm able to store, so if things go to crap for a while, I'll survive.

The ultra rich aren't sitting on coffers of worthless FRNs. They are spending a lot as well, but call it investing.

All paper currency has gone to zero because of hyperinflation. Previous US currencies did that, the German mark did that, Zimbabwe money did that, and Venezuela's money did that. In Venezuela, there is currency blowing around in the gutters because it's not worth picking up. Kids were selling large denomination Zimbabwe currency to tourists at $5 a handful.

So we will have hyperinflation at some point. The hard point is predicting the exact timing. That's why I'm spending a lot of mine on goods that won't lose value.

1
Phishhed44 1 point ago +1 / -0

I’m right behind you. Started late but catchin-up 👍🏼

2
Aspie 2 points ago +2 / -0

Here's a tip. Canning lids are almost nonexistent in stores right now. But you can order all you want from Lehman's online. Youtubers have reviewed the brand they sell and say they're good. I just bought a box of 360 for $84.99. That will hold me for a while. If I can just find more jars.

1
Phishhed44 1 point ago +1 / -0

Just bought a dozen Ball quart jars yesterday?! Only thing short around here (TN) is quart size. You can get all the Pint & smaller you want.

2
Aspie 2 points ago +2 / -0

No one here has anything other than quarts, but they very seldom have those. The last I bought was two cases of quarts at Food Lion, and the shelf only had room for those. And they were jammed in so tight, I had to move adjacent merchandise out of place to get them out. I had one case of pints that I've used for salt, garlic powder, and a few other items that I don't need huge quantities of.

1
Phishhed44 1 point ago +1 / -0

…and most won’t even use what they hoarded…sigh.

1
Ddrake517 1 point ago +1 / -0

I started canning 40 years ago. I knew this was coming and collected lids when the lockdowns started. I have one plastic shoe box of each large and regular. I have hundreds of jars already. My kids are grown and are on their own so I really wanted to transition to large mouth pints rather than the quarts of both sizes that I already have. I can use ½ the contents and store the extra a couple of days if I need to. Im not buying any unless I get a deal. If you are near any Amish ask them. Last I checked they were selling lids for 2.99ba box of 12. A young cousin of mine that started canning a couple of years ago swears by the tattlers. So that may also be an option for some. The start up costs are higher but the Amish say they work for like 8 times.

1
Aspie 1 point ago +1 / -0

I have a stock of Tattlers. It's hard to find jars around here.

1
Ddrake517 1 point ago +1 / -0

I guess I'm lucky. They had an area of jars about 4 x 8nx 3 ft high? The Amish tend to use a lot of unbranded stuff and they were in shipping boxes so I'm didn't pay much attention. Maybe there is an Amish community near you that could help you.

12
Datadude 12 points ago +12 / -0

Difference without a distinction.

Gov. create inflation.

Gov. create shortages.

Gov. disrupts supply chain.

The economy is trying to balance what the government stole off the top.. Plus.. this is the repression side of the ledger as the government tries to maximize revenue from fewer resources and limited activity on a suppressed economy. (That they suppressed) It's a variation of the pump and dump, this is the ugly side.

Financial liberalization.

Financial repression.

Worth studying.

7
DrMcCoy 7 points ago +7 / -0

^ THIS

4
y000danon 4 points ago +4 / -0

It goes deeper.

If you don’t know how Elite rig markets and force give into action - research. Federal Reserve was basically thrown into happening by private bankers actuallly causing the booms and busts themselves via market cartels and then posing as saviors. It works. They do it constantly.

Gov does not sit at the top anymore. Many private businesses even have larger militaries than most nations. General Electric, BP, KBR, Brown & Root, they each have huge military forces. Why? They can’t and won’t count on governments for protection.

Our best tactic is always non-compliance. Figure out every single way you can make your value hedged. Not just money - time, effort, privacy, everything.

For example - E-Mail. Use Google or whatever? They monetize your data. That’s why it’s “free”.

3
Datadude 3 points ago +3 / -0

There is truth in what you say fren, the Cabal pulls MOST strings. And you are right, it's a global acquisition of the world resources thru multi national corporations, (some with revenues exceeding most nations) which in reality are extension of the Cabal. This is the plan they used to finance and manipulate resources to achieve the openly "control and command" (great reset) of the "community commons" (capitalization of the entire world, "everything and everyone" in it ). By some estimates 70 quid trillion dollars worth of value.

I also think there is great value in non compliance, everyone should do everything in their power to stop this anyway they can. To have maximum effect we should shut down entire economies. This would require a mass awakening and cooperation across the board. So today we do what we can, and wake as many up as possible, as quickly as possible.

2
y000danon 2 points ago +2 / -0

Correct.

My focus has been building out a close “cell” of individuals who can take on rolls in specific fields to better the whole.

It’s pretty awesome. We cover a lot of ground

3
DrMcCoy 3 points ago +3 / -0

Catherine Fitts, who is a brilliant economist said:

NON-COMPLIANCE is the only thing that will work to protect ourselves against Communism.

3
y000danon 3 points ago +3 / -0

Fitts @ Solari are spot on. She’s an awesome Lady.

6
Bedminster 6 points ago +6 / -0

Grocery stores 100% have done this. They've raised prices 30% and say "ohhh it's because of the pandemic and our suppliers are having a rough time". On something yes but on most things no. They've raised priced 30% across the board.

6
TSearch [S] 6 points ago +6 / -0

Probably going on neatrly a year now, I’ve been watching the prices, especially at Kroger. Their CEO basically called his shot and said they would “have” to raise prices.

https://www.newsmax.com/us/kroger-inflation-prices-food/2021/09/12/id/1036055/

What I have observed is they raise prices to a point where people buy less. Then suddenly there will be sales where items are “discounted” anywhere from 30% to 75% under the “regular price.” I know this is an age old tactic, but the price differential and their surging profits really point to gouging.

7
PepeSee 7 points ago +7 / -0

Kroger seems to have a monopoly on grocery store false flags too

3
Bedminster 3 points ago +3 / -0

"but the price differential and their surging profits really point to gouging."

BINGO!!!!!

5
Brent75 [M] 5 points ago +5 / -0

Stickied for a great theory and discussion. And interesting CBS would even put this article out, considering it’s actually 75% honest reporting. Hmmmmm.

3
67Vert 3 points ago +3 / -0

Because it protects Biden and Dem policies. Shutdowns killed off much of the competition. Now big corps can charge whatever they want. But CBS blames big corp instead of the shutdowns. 75% honest reporting leaves out a lot of context.

3
TSearch [S] 3 points ago +3 / -0

You have a great point. And it feeds into the idea that what is being called inflation is really a payoff to the big, woke companies who support the DS.

In defense of Brent75, it is surprising CBS would run this article because it shines a light on not just price gouging, but also the root causes that are enabling it. If they know nothing else about Anons by now, they should realize we are willing to dig.

3
SuckaFree 3 points ago +3 / -0

Yes to all of what you're asking.

3
KimJung-Un 3 points ago +3 / -0

We absolutely have inflation. Inflation caused by 50% of the US dollar being printed in one year. The rest of the price increases are due to government shutting down manufacturing and processing plants plus holding up ports due to "safety".

ALL of this is artificial and created by government.

2
TSearch [S] 2 points ago +2 / -0

The practice of hoarding of money in turbulent times led Keynes to develop his theory that government needed to step into the economy and engage in deficit spending during recessions. This concept was eventually perverted into the practice of continually engaging in deficit spending.

If, the money being created was ending up in the hands of consumers who immediately spent it, and, if retailer profits were relatively stable, then we would have a certifiable case of inflation, not price gouging.

Just complete speculation on my part, a significant amount of the money created in the last year is being hoarded by the rich, large woke companies, and our government. It is not ending up in the hands of the 99% and it is not creating the phenomenon of too much money chasing too few goods. Otherwise, the scarcity narrative would be unnecessary.

This is manufactured so people don’t pay attention to where the money is actually going. Again, that is intuition and speculation.

1
Aspie 1 point ago +1 / -0

Keynes is full of shit. His economics doesn't work in the real world. Austrian economics does. I took economics in college and quit going to class after a month or so, because, as young as I was, I could see that the book was heading into fantasyland.

That's why every time, really every single time, you hear economic news on TV, it's always better or worse than the economists expected. They have never once in my 50+ years of seeing the news gotten anything right.

1
TSearch [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

I agree. My personal belief is he just cooked up a way to tilt power to government. I mentioned him just to make the point money that is hoarded is not creating demand or contributing to inflation.

1
Aspie 1 point ago +1 / -0

Anyone with brains is not hoarding nearly worthless paper money. The banks don't even want big cash deposits now. Most of the wealthy don't have large cash positions. They want their money to work for them.

My cash is invested in canned goods, frozen meat, etc.

2
heebiejeebie 2 points ago +2 / -0

picked up some eggs today... more than 3x what the price was at the beginning of the year! butter is almost double... in the same time... there's some gouging going on and it's NOT the farmers that are getting rich!

2
Brooklyn_Patriot_76 2 points ago +2 / -0

get two chickens. a dozen eggs a week fren, and they will eat the bugs in your yard.

2
TSearch [S] 2 points ago +2 / -0

I know I can go to three or four different groceries today and pay wildly different prices for eggs.

1
Wretchedwisdom 1 point ago +1 / -0

That "convenient" Asian bird flu. Almost a million chickens destroyed.

1
Aspie 1 point ago +1 / -0

Where I'm at, eggs have gone up only about 50% in the past couple of years. Butter is double at some stores, but I stocked up a year ago.

There is a YouTube channel called "Appalachia's Homestead with Patera," and Patera said that feed had gone up so much that she would have to sell eggs at over $11 a dozen. So she has told all her customers that she's not selling any more for a while.

On the other hand, the local Food Lion and Aldi both have had chicken leg quarters on sale for 49 cents a pound, which is a very good price any time. There are now shrink-wrapped packages in my freezer.

2
AngelCole 2 points ago +2 / -0

I believe the dollar is worthless, crashing, that's why everything seems/is expensive. They've devalued the dollar and so it's like Venezuela.

2
ravonaf 2 points ago +2 / -0

It's not price gouging. If it was people would simply shop somewhere else, and they would have to lower prices to compete. These are planned shortages as well as inflation.

3
TSearch [S] 3 points ago +3 / -0

Good point. I know I can go to four different groceries right now an pay wildly different prices for the same product. But not everyone is willing to do that.

Or, if I’m patient there will be periodic gluts of a product and significant sales on that item. That’s how I’ve built up a several month supply of food with zero panic buying.

1
ravonaf 1 point ago +1 / -0

I want to know if this is going to be like the toilet paper thing where at most it's going to be really inconvenient. Such as rationing of certain products or shortages of niceties. Or are we going to have straight up starvation in America. Are there going to be massive food riots with entire cities being burned to the ground.

1
Aspie 1 point ago +1 / -0

Everyone needs to stock up all they can.

I never ran out of toilet paper during the shortage. I didn't run out of gas either. I've seen both on shortage in the past.

2
UnbreakablePatriot 2 points ago +2 / -0

Increased government spending combines with low taxes . Same 1970s formula Milton Friedman talked about in why the great depression happened and the 70s inflation happened. Only thing he got wrong was that we wouldn't do it again apparently, that we would learn from these financial mistakes.

Although we could say we did learn....its just they are using that knowledge on purpose to break us.

2
Cyberhawk 2 points ago +2 / -0

It’s all manufactured. Always has been. Think of the Egyptians, and we’re the Israelites. Once valued, now slaves to this machine. Waiting on a miracle.

2
BasedCEO 2 points ago +2 / -0

Probably both.

In 2019 I was able to purchase a Brand Spanking new 7x16 enclosed tandem axle trailer for $4.5k. In January of this year I sold that very same trailer used and beat to shit for $6.8k. New ones in my area were going for $12k-14k!!

Now someone else wants to buy another used trailer from me, I checked prices today, new ones are going for $10k-$11k right now.

2
Conspiracytheorist 2 points ago +2 / -0

The ports in China have thousands of ships anchored and sitting to pick up goods, due to their strict covid lockdowns. The factories are also at 50% capacity or 0.

While it’s not the food per say, it’s the packaging for our food and other products we’d see on the shelves.

4-6 weeks from now we will see the shelves become bare, because the supply chain is so backed up from China.

Then the food shortages will happen. I’m going to predict this:

  1. in august when student loan repayments kick back in, they’ll be delayed again.
  2. dems will promise to help student loan repayment for the vote (which we know is bullshit). This will effect everyone, not just people with student loans. So I don’t wanna hear “I don’t have loans.” It will effect the economy and YOU.
  3. when the food shortages truly begin, it’ll be like the BLM riots except people stealing food/toilet paper/etc.
  4. the dems can’t lose power, knowing the red wave is coming and will do /something/ to prevent the elections from happening.

It’s gonna be a shit storm.

2
CIngone 2 points ago +2 / -0

I see all the comments on supply and demand, but there is even more to this go round than that. It won't be popular I know, but it is not China that holds the majority of our debt, it's us. Normally when you borrow, you are borrowing money that someone else has and made available to you. This kind of borrowing keeps the amount of dollars in circulation the same though, contrary to our debt.

Now it is actually illegal for our Federal Reserve to monetize (or buy) our own debt directly, they have more and more over the years, sold the bonds to hedge funds, then the fed has bought from them as an indirect sale creating a loophole in the law. But where does the Federal Reserve get that money to buy up all that debt? If you guessed they print more, go to the head of the class!

So as we sit, the way to cure inflationary pressure normally would be to reduce the money supply and raise interest rates to slow borrowing and spending. However due to the stimulus payments, and reckless spending most of it is not available to retract, but even what is, the Federal Reserve seems reluctant to either retract the supply, or raise interest rates. I don't get the retraction, but I think we all know what would happen if they raised interest to even a too 10% would push the interest on our national debt into the unmanageable range and a meaningful 15% would add 4.5 trillion in debt, just to cover interest. So they literally can't raise interest rates or we would almost immediately go bust.

Sorry for the long winded post, we all just need to understand there is more to it than just supply and demand and we have dug ourselves a really deep hole edited for bad math

3
TSearch [S] 3 points ago +3 / -0

In a sense you’re describing a way for them to launder money. I think that is what Ron Paul has been trying to shed a light in for years now. Sadly people too easily dismiss him.

1
CIngone 1 point ago +1 / -0

Yup, that's exactly what is happening and is it any wonder Xiden slipped up and said that inflation was good? Of course not since the government is pretty much the only one that makes out during it. Think of it, tax rates are not indexed, so as people make more due to inflation, they also move into higher tax brackets since the brackets don't adjust for inflation.

1
VetforTrump 1 point ago +1 / -0

Could be both

1
DaesDaemar 1 point ago +1 / -0

Basically it's the same thing, if people think they can get away with charging higher prices they will.

1
Aspie 1 point ago +1 / -0

One thing that's puzzling is that I can get a loaf of bread at one store for over $3, but less than $1 at another store in the same town. Canned vegetables are twice as much at one store as at another.

It's also puzzling that gas in a large area varies only a penny or two, even though there are obvious differences in the cost of doing business that ought to make the prices vary by 10 or 20 cents from store to store. I know that in my home town, there was collusion between the outlets. There was one certain store that everyone else watched. If the Etna station changed his price, everyone else would change theirs as soon as they found out, regardless of what their wholesale price was.

Everyone needs to stock up on supplies while there's still something in the stores. Luckily, there are still good prices in my area. Two different chains had chicken leg quarters for 49 cents a pound, and plenty in the meat case.

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TSearch [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

I said the same thing a couple times today. I can drive to different stores within a 5 mile radius and pay wildly different prices.

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1sketchyv 1 point ago +1 / -0

It costs us almost 4x more to get our products into our building than it did 2 years ago. Then add the cost to deliver them, cost of labor, and increases tax rates.

This all gets passed on down to the consumer.

People don't open businesses to lose money.

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TSearch [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

You’re right, no one goes into business to lose money. And sure, higher prices are technically inflation, but the debate is not if there is inflation, the debate is about the root cause. Price gouging or too much money chasing to few goods?

Are you busier than you have ever been? Is our economy overheating, growing by leaps and bounds? Or are companies up and down the supply chain seeing an opportunity to increase prices while they can?

And again, you’re right, we are paying for it, what we are seeing is basically a tax that is dropping into the coffers of big companies. But I can’t say I’ve had an equivalent boost in pay.

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SeeAreJay 1 point ago +1 / -0

Unless your in Canada then losing is considered par for the course

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that_guy_pming_tits 1 point ago +1 / -0

That describes alleged price fixing IMO. TV manufacturers were guilty of it 10 years or so ago and prices flew down.

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DrumNbass 1 point ago +1 / -0

Holy fuck that is a really good question

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pente1776 1 point ago +1 / -0

Inflation.

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scolai 1 point ago +1 / -0

Keep your eyes on the coasts. If they do things like raise the gas tax for absolutely no reason, it's a matter of corruption.

We're all looking at you, California.

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The_Expert 1 point ago +1 / -0

I was sitting in car with my wife and said exactly this. Why are we paying 25%-40% more for food? I said if 3 years ago there were 20 bottles of hot sauce on the shelf and the price was 30% cheaper, shouldn't there be 10 bottles on the shelf today if the price is so high? Makes no sense. I said price is adjusted by supply and demand and inflation. If the supply is low, the price goes up. Clearly, we don't have a supply issue. This is all inflation and manufactured fear.

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TSearch [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

And I seriously doubt a host of new consumers are snapping up that hot sauce, because again, there would be less on the shelf.

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jackrotten 1 point ago +1 / -0

Forcing inflation is just monumental price gouging made legal

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anon1138 1 point ago +1 / -0

Looking at the futures market, after the Russia Russia Russia indecent, prices shot up. However, not long after, the market settled back into a normal range. Wheat, corn, crude, natural gas, soy... It all shot to a record or near record high (Obummer era). then they all came back down and hovering around Obama era prices.

With all the supply chain issues, more money chasing fewer goods, etc. Why don't we see inflation taking off in the futures market. Today, the price of crude was hanging around $100/barrel. Prices at the pump don't make much sense. Seems they are hiking the pump prices when the market prices don't justify such massive increases

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TSearch [S] 1 point ago +1 / -0

What would prices be if speculators were not part of the market? They add no value in the supply chain. I realize that isn’t free trade. It’s just the idea a person or company who never touches these necessary commodities can affect their prices through speculation disturbs me.

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Quixotic 1 point ago +1 / -0

it’s both buddy